“Do you make money for public appearances?”—Anna Faktorovich, PhD Interview

Faktorovich: You were drawing for visitors to your booth at the ALA. I believe you also do these types of drawings during your art presentations at schools. Do you do these public art projects because of your desire to perform your art before a live audience? Do you ever make money on these appearances? Do you use them for research or to market your illustrations to kids? At ALA, were you giving any of the resulting drawings away? You had tossed a few of them onto the carpet in front of you at ALA, and you toss them on the floor of auditoriums etc. in your school presentations. Do you toss them down for symbolic reasons or to illicit sympathy, or because you want to display them and you don’t have board to clip them onto? Were you drawing what visitors asked for, or whatever came to mind? Do you doodle and free-draw to come up with ideas for your illustrations? If not, what do you do to research ideas or to come up with initial character sketches?

AdamsDrawing Is My Super Power! That would be my t-shirt slogan. I find an audience, whether drawing on a pad, a napkin, or in a Best Sketchbook. I drew for free when I was younger. Some people appreciated the gesture, other discarded my effort. In the 3rd grade, I began to charge for my time and the appreciation level increase. This remains true today.

My first professional illustration contracts came from tossing drawings on the floor at Book Expo America in Los Angeles, California. I did this both for symbolic and sympathetic purposes, depending on the audience.

Publishing (writing, illustration, and marketing) is about inspiring an emotion. I can’t keep every drawing, so I give them to conference audiences who feel sympathy when they step on a “pretty picture.” I also joke, “This drawing is worthless until I sign it!” Publishing audiences find my personality a plus in the working relationship.

IMG_6356I’ve meet over 1 million students through paid elementary school visits. I walk on “pretty pictures” to show students and teachers sheets of paper have less value than the pages within a book. This reinforces the need to journal in hardbound books.

Do I give away drawings for free? Yes, I’ve given away over 45,000 drawings in eight years like the ones you mentioned at ALA. My gift makes others happy and in return makes me happy. I do have two rules. Children are the recipients of most drawings unless it’s for a teacher’s classroom or at a conference. Also, I only draw one picture per person, per day. This rule stemmed from my own children asking me to draw instead of doing it themselves. My children get one picture, just like anyone else’s child.

IMG_3952I have over 100 journals (23,000 pages of drawing and writing). These journals are 20 years of research and inspiration. Illustration clients are asked to provide me a list of 5 of their favorite children’s books, 5 new books they discovered at the library or bookstore, and 5 things they’d do for free. Their favorite children’s books tell me who they were. The new books tell me what they expect based on paper types, finishes, and dimensions. Lastly, incorporating something they love in the illustrations will boost discussion topics with readers.
Read the complete interview with Mark Adams, Award-Winning IllustratorAdams-Author Bio Photo-mwa.company-template with Anna Faktorovich, PhD

Cooking in Fern Valley—Aileen Stewart

Aileen Stewart-headshotPack your suitcase and grocery bag! Aileen Stewart, author of the Fern Valley book series, has a new book. Cooking in Fern Valley, A Collection of Stories and Recipes is her latest book filled with short stories about life and friendship on the Curlytail Farm.

Join in the disasters, dilemmas, and choices of the farm animal children’s daily adventures. Respect, love, and compassion describe the many friendships. The short chapters would make this a fun daily summer read.

The endearing relationships between the animal students and their teachers is perfect for classrooms! Students and teachers will enjoy the tasty mixture of math and science. From fractions to combining ingredients, the learning is equally as fun as Aileen’s stories.

These delicious Curlytail Farm adventures and recipes will fill your heart, mind, and tummy!

Reviewed by:

Mark Wayne Adams is an award-winning illustrator, author, and publisher of more than 40 children’s books. View Books and Awards

Website(s):  www.markwayneadams.comwww.mwa.company

Social Media:

Fern Valley-www.mwa.company Return to Fern Valley-www.mwa.companyCooking in Fern Valley-www.mwa.company

Must Read List: Schools: A Niche Market for Authors

This month’s MWA, Inc. Must Read List selection is also a repeat favorite. I stumbled into public speaking through a teacher invitation. Elementary school visits are so much fun! I visit between 45 and 90 schools each year.

Jane R. Wood author of Schools: A Niche Market for Authors, finds that schools are a unique market for authors. Whether an author writes children’s picture books, young adult books, or even adult fiction or nonfiction books, the goal for most authors is the same – to sell books!

As the author of four juvenile fiction books, Jane Wood has been selling her books to schools since 2004. More than 50 percent of her annual revenue comes from book sales to schools, speaking fees to schools, and book sales to students at those schools. For Jane this is a win-win.

Jane’s visits are a valuable benefit to the schools she visits. As a former teacher, her goal is to inspire reading in students. By creating characters that children can relate to, and scenes that engage their interests and imaginations, she promotes literacy. When she participates in an author visit at a school, she makes a connection with her readers, which is beneficial to both of parties. And when she talks about the writing process, she reinforces what their teachers teach them in language arts lessons.

There are many things to consider when targeting schools as a market for book sales. In her book she shares many strategies: how to make books attractive to educators; how to promote books to schools; how to develop presentations; and ways to generate revenue from this niche market.

Jane R. Wood can be reached at her website:  www.janewoodbooks.com

Children’s Books: Illustration & Marketing

Children’s Books: Illustration & Marketing

  • Workshop Title:  Children’s Books: Illustration & Marketing
  • Instructor:  Mark Wayne Adams, CEO MWA, Inc., FAPA President
  • Date:  Saturday, April 11, 2015
  • Time:  1:00 p.m. to 3:00 p.m.
  • Location:  110 West Railroad Avenue, Dawson Springs, KY 42408
  • Price:  $50.00

Award-winning author, illustrator, and publisher Mark Wayne Adams shares principles for producing successful children’s books. Learn personalized techniques to increase sales at festivals, schools, bookstores, and even lunch!

Receive valuable insight, marketing techniques, and a dynamic presentation about illustrations. Discussion covers the importance of cover art, how to work with an illustrator (including costs), rights needed for reproduction, and an overview of services professional illustrators provide.

Topics Covered:

  • How to find, contract, and work with illustrators
  • Value and importance of illustrations and cover art
  • Rights for reproduction of illustrations
  • How to incorporate educational illustration resources
  • How to extend the reading experience with illustrations
  • Incorporating marketing through illustrations

This class is for teachers, writers, authors, illustrators, and publishers interested in children’s book publishing. Laptops, iPads, and/or tablets are not required. Wifi access is provided. Participants receive an interactive course pdf with resource links to topics discussed.

Class size is LIMITED to 15 people. Register early to reserve a seat!

Register Here.

Meet Irina Gonikberg Dolinskiy

Irina Gonikberg Dolinskiy is a corporate/business attorney, as well as a classically trained pianist and an avid writer and storyteller. Having practiced law in New York for a number of years, Irina is now a partner at a law firm in Central Florida, where she resides with her husband and her daughter, Jayne. Irina’s son, Mitchell—the original audience and inspiration for her stories—lives and works in New York City.

Parts of Speech Parade, New York City was first written as an entertaining grammar aid for the author’s then-young son, Mitchell. After becoming fast friends with the Noun, Verb, Adjective, Preposition, Conjunction, and Interjection, Mitchell started recognizing their familiar faces in every book, making his reading adventures fun and enjoyable.

While Mitchell is now a college graduate, the author is eager to share the Parts of Speech Parade with today’s girls and boys who are newly discovering the magic of reading.

Read more about Parts of Speech Parade, New York City

Mark, this is simply beyond amazing!! I am absolutely speechless (no pun intended), and in awe of your brilliant creativity!” – Irina Dolinskiy