3 Reasons Why Authors Should Blog

3 Reasons Why Authors Should Blog:

  • to interview authors in similar genres or topics;
  • to answer reader questions;
  • and to create beyond the book resources for their book(s)

1. Interview:

Interviewing authors in similar genres with numerous followers has multiple benefits. When the author interviewed shares the post with her followers, the interviewer’s blog and book(s) reach a new market.

2. Answer questions:

Detailed email responses to questions authors answer frequently are good blog posts. Refer future people with that question to the blog link and say:

“There are many useful resources on my blog. Type your question in the search. If you don’t find the answer email me the question I’ll gladly answer it.”

Then make the response a blog post too!

When a person does a Google search for the same question, the blog post will show up in the search. The more authors refer their posts the higher their ranking and book exposure becomes.

3. Book Resources:

Use writing, findings, or excerpts from a book’s research as blog posts. This will answer reader questions like above and become teachable moments. Add hyperlinks throughout the blog to the resources. Inform the website or company that you are directing traffic to them. Ask if they might reciprocate by sharing information about you, the book, or pay to advertise in the blog post.

The blog is one of best ways to engage and continue reader discussions.

M. W. Adams, author of G’DAY: Aints the third novel in the Famiy Tree Novel series

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Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

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This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe reading experiences.

MOMENT ONE: lacrosse

MOMENT TWO: blue, larrikin, tallo, tobacco, water well

MOMENT THREE: bluey, fossick, furphy, mate, stuffed, I’ll be

MOMENT FOUR: Pennyrile

MOMENT FIVE: barbecue, cicada, fella, mob, moolah, Victoria

MOMENT SIX: down under, platypus, puddle-snorts, ta

MOMENT SEVEN: caddywompus, cricket, Darwin, fella, galah, poa, vegemite

MOMENT EIGHT: coydog, digger, galah, malle, Willy Willy, Wolle paper

MOMENT NINE: billa bong, bourbon, mozzie

MOMENT TEN: doovalacky

MOMENT ELEVEN: dingo, marsupial, pig-footed bandicoot

MOMENT THIRTEEN: candlestix, stalactite

MOMENT FOURTEEN: cassowary, joey, Tasmanian tiger

MOMENT SIXTEEN: opal, noodling, stalagmite

MOMENT NINETEEN: noodling

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of Family Tree Novel series, choose these helpful links:

When do you decide to share the OUTBACK writing with others?

When do you decide to share the OUTBACK writing with others?

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I waited until the OUTBACK book was half completed—about eight chapters. These chapters are rough and very general in creative language. My goal was to give a bland idea of the plot, character action, and historical content. If this was enough to inspire others to ask questions or want more, then the creative embellishments would be much easier.

For the first novel, I had my wife read it. She is very thorough and not a reader. Needless to say, she only read it once, and wasn’t excited. My next version was much more polished and the reader had decent feedback.

By the Beta Reader stage, all sixteen chapters had been edited using Fire Up Your Fiction: An Editor’s Guide to Writing Compelling Stories, written by a colleague, Jodi Renner. Her book was a great resource for a newbie or established writer. I went chapter by chapter and was critical of what I’d written. Trimming excess really makes a difference when creating a fast reading fiction book.

Read the full OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters, Conversation with the Author

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

16-OUTBACK-Language_of_the_Outback-By_Moment

This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe Outback experiences.

MOMENT ONE:  bothers, G’day, Heterochromia, mate, shonky, sinisters, willy willy

MOMENT TWO:  bloody, boomerang, Kentucky, Outback, shag on a rock

MOMENT FOUR:  furphy, galah, larrikins

MOMENT SIX:  Aussie, Australia, mamaay, momu, sand shoes

MOMENT SEVEN:  sing-song

MOMENT EIGHT:  aints, kussins, Malle, uncools

MOMENT TWELVE:  Billa bing bong boom, bushie

MOMENT FOURTEEN:  water boarder

MOMENT SIXTEEN:  Florida, sunshine state

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of the OUTBACK book, choose these helpful links:

OUTBACK: Word Search

Reading Group Guide for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

Summer Reading List: “Jilli, That’s Silly! A Story About Being a Girl”

With this lighthearted story, children will relate to Jilli and the silly things she does, while parents will appreciate the humor behind these happenings. Jillian Wallaby is always doing silly things and her mom is always letting her know, exclaiming “Jilli, that’s silly!” at the silly things her daughter does. Finally, her mom realizes that she isn’t being silly after all—she’s just being a girl. Also featured is a book talk to engage children in discussion, imagination, and perception.

Jilli, That’s Silly! A Story About Being a Girl is part of our Summer Reading List for Students! Purchase your own or check the book out at the local library. If it’s not available at the library, request it be added.

Jilli, That’s Silly! A Story About Being a Girl written by Christa Carpenter, illustrated by Mark Wayne Adams, and edited by Jennifer Thomas.

Ridiculous & Silly Book Giveaway!

To kick off February’s I Love to Read Month, MWA, Inc. is giving away one copy each of “Nicholas, That’s Ridiculous!” and “Jilli, That’s Silly!” Whether you know a ridiculous boy or a silly girl, these books will be a hit. Each book includes the story and a “Book Talk” to engage children in discussion, imagination, and perception. These books combined have won twelve picture book awards and qualify as Renaissance Learning Accelerated Readers. Great not only for home reading but classroom as well!

Get the Accelerated Reader (AR) Quizzes here:

Nicholas, That’s Ridiculous!

Jilli, That’s Silly!

Nicholas, That’s Ridiculous! and Jilli, That’s Silly! are two of MWA, Inc’s most popular children’s books. To celebrate, MWA,Inc will give away one copy of each book. (Total retail value: $29.90) To qualify for our giveaway; like, share, or post about the ridiculous boy or silly girl in your life on this blog before February 28, 2015. Persons posting must live within the continental United States. Giveaway will not be shipped outside the continental United States. Winner will be randomly selected and notified March 1, 2015.

Items Given Away:

Nicholas, That’s Ridiculous! Written by Christa Carpenter and Illustrations by Mark Wayne Adams

ISBN:  9781596160026

Retail Price:  $14.95

 

Jilli, That’s Silly! Written by Christa Carpenter and Illustrations by Mark Wayne Adams

ISBN:  9781596160156

Retail Price:  $14.95