3 Reasons Why Authors Should Blog

3 Reasons Why Authors Should Blog:

  • to interview authors in similar genres or topics;
  • to answer reader questions;
  • and to create beyond the book resources for their book(s)

1. Interview:

Interviewing authors in similar genres with numerous followers has multiple benefits. When the author interviewed shares the post with her followers, the interviewer’s blog and book(s) reach a new market.

2. Answer questions:

Detailed email responses to questions authors answer frequently are good blog posts. Refer future people with that question to the blog link and say:

“There are many useful resources on my blog. Type your question in the search. If you don’t find the answer email me the question I’ll gladly answer it.”

Then make the response a blog post too!

When a person does a Google search for the same question, the blog post will show up in the search. The more authors refer their posts the higher their ranking and book exposure becomes.

3. Book Resources:

Use writing, findings, or excerpts from a book’s research as blog posts. This will answer reader questions like above and become teachable moments. Add hyperlinks throughout the blog to the resources. Inform the website or company that you are directing traffic to them. Ask if they might reciprocate by sharing information about you, the book, or pay to advertise in the blog post.

The blog is one of best ways to engage and continue reader discussions.

M. W. Adams, author of G’DAY: Aints the third novel in the Famiy Tree Novel series

“Can you summarize what you would tell students on the first day?”—Anna Faktorovich, PhD Interview

Faktorovich: If you were teaching a class on beginner digital illustration for children, can you summarize what you would tell your students on the first day of class (after you cover the syllabus etc.)? They are eager to get going with making a great illustration and hope for some practical advice, having some basic drawing skills under their belt.


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Adams: Anna, you should invite me to speak at a local school to see firsthand. I have 3 rules for students of any age: raise your hand if you have a question; pay attention; and ask good questions. Raise your hand and use your voice, the best time to learn is now. Pay attention because the knowledge you want is in front of you. And ask good questions because you’ll get good answers. Average question: “Mr. Adams do you like being an illustrator?” Answer: “Yes.” Good Question: “Everything you’ve asked in this interview!”

Also I use the visual example that at three years old, I scribbled and my mom said “Wow!” One day I drew an obscure heart-shaped image. My mom didn’t say anything but loved on me. I kept drawing the heart and received the same response from my dad. When I arrived in Kindergarten, I showed my teacher I could write my ABC’s. She said, “One day you’ll be a writer.” From age 3 to 5, I wasn’t born an artist or a writer, but through practice and positive feedback I became one. Every person is a product of the type of effort and encouragement we give and receive.

I think this is why I’ve visited so many elementary schools. I’m not there to sell a book; I’m there to inspire at least one person to achieve their dream.
Read the complete interview with Mark Adams, Award-Winning IllustratorAdams-Author Bio Photo-mwa.company-template with Anna Faktorovich, PhD

Student Question: “Do Your Children Draw?

Yes, both my children are unique artists. When each was around six years old, I gave her and him a Best Sketchbook. I told each “I’ll only draw with you in your journal so our drawings won’t get lost.” They were only allowed to start a new journal upon completion of their last.

My daughter, Isabella, would ask me to draw things once. Then a few days later she’d ask me to draw something else. She learned to draw by copying and listening to my instructions. Since then she’s won numerous competitions for drawing. Her goal is to become a singer, not an artist.

My son, Carter, was completely opposite. He rarely asked me to draw. He observed me with my journal and while I drew with Isabella. I discovered his journal filled with Lego patterns. His talent was spacial and usually consisted of rooms or building plans. He is a talented artist in a completely different way.

No matter who you are, time in your Best Sketchbook is inspiring to people around you. One of my favorite pastimes is flipping through other artists’ sketchbooks and journals.

Student Question: “What Did You Look Like as a Kid?”

As a kid, I looked like any other kid. At least one tooth was missing from first grade through sixth grade. My 1970’s wardrobe was cool. I didn’t like to brush my hair, however I enjoyed dressing for special occasions. By the sixth grade, I wore glasses—thanks to many hours playing my Atari.

Do you ever think about being an adult? I did. My mind was full of questions. What life would be like when I was an adult? Would I leave home? Would I fly on an airplane? Would I drive a car? Would I look the same in twenty years?

The photos show a gradual change each year. Daily I learned new things shaping me into the man I am today. My parents would say, be a kid as long as you can. I now understand what that means.

Growing up is a slow process, however aging is much faster. My favorite thing about being an adult is: being an adult means you can be a kid too!