AR Reading Quiz for “G’DAY: Aints”

AR Reading Quiz for G’DAY: Aints

17-Adams-FTN-G'DAY-Reading Quiz
1. Who are Driew’s tormentors in Moment One?

2. Which character is Driew’s “uncool” in this book?

3. Where did Driew learn Ida Mae’s fruit tree had grown?

4. What does Marq use as a trade for Jameson Junior’s mule, Kate?

5. What gift does Gulia receive from Momu?

6. What business does Chi and Mac start in Dawson Springs?

7. What event caused Nieve and Marq to leave their Florida home?

8. Which found object does Driew’s Magic Man use for the doll’s eyes?

9. What missing object did Killiope return to Driew at Nieve’s wake?

10. How does Gayle receive the money for her braces?

 

READING QUIZ KEY

G'DAY-Aints-www.mwa.company-Flat Book

 

Advertisements

Reading Group Guide for “G’DAY: Aints”

Reading Group Guide for G’DAY: Aints

17-Adams-FTN-G'DAY-Reading_Group_Guide

1. G’Day is defined as “hello.” How does the author parallel the book, G’Day: Aints, to the greeting “hello?”

2. Does “G’Day” appear to be a friendlier greeting than “hello” for the children?

3. Have you or someone you known ever suffered through the loss of a loved one? What action(s) did you observe at each stage of grief?

4. How does the loss of one person in your community affect relationships, finances, and businesses?

5. Are field trips and writing about local landmarks important to school age children to better understand their community and their roles for its future?

6. What are Driew’s perceptions of his little sinister, Gayle, and could she have been perceived differently if Driew had understood her sooner?

7. In what way(s) did Gayle’s friendship with Snow force Driew to grow? Is there a defining moment in Driew’s maturation?

8. How does Driew’s adopting the word “oldies” to replace the word “parents” influence your view of Driew’s parents? At what age did you see your parents as old and why?

9. How do you think Gayle would have handled being the youngest Qweepie sibling? What are some ways the youngest boy might be treated that the youngest girl wouldn’t be?

10. What action stops Gayle’s aggression toward Driew in moment nineteen? Do you have love line boundaries drawn in your own family relationship?

11. How does Gayle’s stealing influence Driew’s relationship with her, Snow, and Nadia? How might their relationship be different if she had been open sooner?

12. What role does Marq’s dependence on substance affect Driew’s family?

13. What role does “Aint” Nadia Eli play in Driew’s story? How does she influence Driew’s perspective of character traits?

G'DAY-Aints-www.mwa.company-Flat Book

 

G’DAY: The Magic Man

This complimentary excerpt from G’DAY: Aints. Read the Family Roots and Moment One also.

—•—

THE MAGIC MAN

Dreamtime created me with no story, no name, and no family. I can hear, and see, but have no language to record my story. I must learn to sing out or forever remain lost in the Never Never.

In Australia’s Aboriginal culture, songs keep sacred lands and family trees around me alive. My beginning starts with a songline, one of numerous creator-beings’ paths created across the land and sky during Dreaming.

The path of creator-beings is evident from their footprints upon the land, like lush billa bongs, rock formations, and other natural marvels. One songline can cross numerous lands through forests of family trees belonging to diverse cultures. Proper sing-song sequences have navigated Aboriginal people vast distances through the Never Never land’s extensive songline systems—why not me?

Language is not a barrier here in the Never Never because sing-song describes the land, and to listen to its rhythm is walking upon a sacred songline. Singing the wrong direction along a songline is a sacrilege that creates epic, dire, and tragic moments.

My journey is a heart-pounding right-of-passage walkabout. Not every word will be written to find my name, family, and story. I share this songline with two other boys: one of us is lost, one stolen, and one longs to return from the Never Never.

Timing is the most important factor in all our stories. Timeless footprints on the Never Never land uproot passion. What does passion mean in this story? The Latin word for passion is pati, meaning suffer for what you love. And so I shall.

There are two sides to every family tree story—one hidden inside and one that escapes like leaves on the wind. Readers are neither at the beginning nor the end of my story, only navigating the long middle part of life, questioning the past and pondering the future. Following my songline may uproot a reader’s passions, causing them to suffer for what I love.

—Magic Man

—•—

G'DAY-Aints-www.mwa.company-Flat Book
Text and illustrations copyright © 2018 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

AR Reading Quiz for “DOWN UNDER: Kussins”

AR Reading Quiz for DOWN UNDER: Kussins

16-Adams-FTN-DOWN UNDER-Reading Quiz

1. What state did Driew move from?

2. Which character is a “digger” in this book?

3. What artifacts do the Poe boys discover Outback?

4. Which marsupial does Driew adopt as a pet?

5. What country does Gulia visit on holiday?

6. What food attracts visitors to the Dawson Springs Annual Homecoming?

7. What name did Gulia and Driew give to their tree?

8. What found object does Driew use to light his way?

9. What summer responsibility does Marq give Driew instead of mowing?

10. Which of these characters is not Driew’s kussin?

 

READING QUIZ KEY

down-under-kussins-3d-book-cover-9781596160385-www-mwa-company-72dpi

 

AR Reading Quiz for “OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters”

AR Reading Quiz for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

16-Adams-FTN-OUTBACK-Reading Quiz

1. Who is the Australian girl-next-door?

2. Who is the housekeeper in the book’s name?

3. What does Killiope do to earn the money needed to pay Gulia to walk Driew home?

4. What object does Killiope use to torment Driew?

5. Who is Driew Qweepie?

6. What project does Driew help his father, Marq, complete?

7. What town did Driew move to?

8. What name does Driew give to the mysterious floating eyes?

9. Where is the entrance to Driew’s workshop?

10. What was the first gift he received from Gulia?

 

READING QUIZ KEY

OUTBACK-Bothers & Sinisters-www.mwa.company

 

Reading Group Guide for “DOWN UNDER: Kussins”

Reading Group Guide for DOWN UNDER: Kussins

16-Adams-Family Tree Novel-DOWN UNDER-Reading_Group_Guide

1. Down Under is defined as the continent of Australia. How does the author parallel down under, when referring to the moments, to Down Under, in reference to the continent of Australia?

2. How is the author’s use of moments rather than chapters important in this series?

3. What are Driew’s early perceptions of his big bother, Pester, and could Pester have been perceived differently if Driew had understood him sooner?

4. How does Pester’s rank in the family hierarchy after Killiope’s departure the military affect his family?

5. In what way has Pester forced Driew to grow? Is there a defining moment in Driew’s maturation?

6. How does Able and Cain Poe’s family life contrast Driew’s? Would they have the same feelings toward Driew as Pester and Payne if they were his brothers?

7. How do you think Pester would have handled being the youngest Qweepie sibling? What are some ways older boys might be treated that the youngest boy wouldn’t be?

8. What discovery in the Dingo chapter stops Pester’s aggression? Is there a line he has crossed that keeps him from forgiving himself?

9. How does friendship resolve the issues Able and Cain have with Driew? How might their relationship be different if it had happened sooner?

10. How does Driew’s relationship with Pester affect his relationship with Able and Cain?

11. What role does Dingo play in the novel, as a permanent fixture on the farm and in Driew’s family?

12. What role does water play in Driew’s story? How does it influence Driew’s actions?

13. How do you think Marq’s secret influenced his decisions until he shared it with Nieve and Driew? What affect do you think keeping Marq’s secret will have on both characters’ relationships?down-under-kussins-3d-book-cover-9781596160385-www-mwa-company-72dpi

 

OUTBACK: Moment One

This complimentary excerpt from OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters. Read the Introduction and Moment Two also.

—•—

MOMENT ONE

HANGIN’

“Be them ever so cruel, there’s no family crueler than ours!” Driew Qweepie’s hooded tormenter chuckled. “Go! Here comes that Brown kid!”

Four teenage silhouettes bounced through the overgrown pumpkin patch, their escape concealed by the shadowy tree line.

Fall’s first cool breeze crept through the once popular town of Dawson Springs, ending the suffocation of summer’s dog days. Driew Qweepie’s tween body hung limp in his overalls from the scarecrow’s post. Cawing crows, darker than his hair, mocked him from their perch above.

His eyelids rose and fell over eyes of blue and green. Heterochromia, the condition was called, thought to be hereditary, or caused by a disease or an injury. Since he was healthy and the only family member with heterochromia, Driew’s explanation was an unimaginable injury. His siblings teased, “Dropped on your head is your problem.”

Thick wire-rim glasses obscured the condition. Non-family members awed at Driew’s pleasing appearance. His dark complexion, chocolate ringlets of hair, and dwarf-like size made him a doll for sure.

As he hung from the scarecrow’s perch, his consciousness swayed like a porch swing in a gentle wind. The hangin’ left him to reflect on his family hierarchy. An unwritten historical timeline that flipped through his mind recalled a decade of prank-filled albums created by four tormenting siblings. Soon his eleventh year would bring new volumes of teenage tortures.

Labeled “little bother,” he was the youngest and lowest ranking member in the Qweepie family. From the first moment of his life, he learned trust was not easily earned. His bothers’ and sinisters’ torments had worsened since moving to the Kentucky farm.

His parents, Nieve and Marq Qweepie, uprooted their Florida lives to resolve nasty letters received about their farm’s demise. Marq listed the property for sale after his father died and never intended to return. Ida Mae, the caretaker during Marq’s absence, became feeble and unable to maintain the farm properly.

“She needs you. She needs you,” a voiced echoed melodically, awakening Driew. His heavy eyelids rose to reveal a hazy heterochromic gaze reflecting his own.

“PSST! Holy Dooley! You alive mate? G’Day! Here down under!” a voice called below him.

Driew’s light-sensitive eyes focused on the pumpkin patch. Behind the scarecrow’s post, the setting sun cast a veil of darkness over the stranger. “Wh-wh-who are you? Wh-wh-what do you want?” Driew’s voice screeched into the silent patch.

“I heard whimpers. Thought I’d find an abandoned pup out here, or something entertaining. People dump treasures off this road all the time.” The stranger pointed toward the road leading to the Qweepie farm.

Scarecrow was an elevation from being a “little bother.” This prank signified his torturous life—a pawn to ward away intruders.

“No worries. They aren’t coming back,” coughed Driew.

“Who did this, mate?”

“My bothers and sinisters.”

The stranger tugged at Driew’s overall straps, releasing him from their confines. The stranger backed away in awe of Driew’s glide to safety.

A whirling cloud of dust howled through the patch. Crows abandoned their perch, alerting the hillside of the disturbance.

“A willy willy! Let’s rack off! These spirits give me the heeby jeebies!” The tween stranger grabbed Driew’s overall straps and led him away.

—•—

Text and illustrations copyright © 2016 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

Summer Reading List: “DOWN UNDER: Kussins”

The Family Tree Novel series’ steady, enduring story is like a tree growing against nature’s will toward the sky. Driew Qweepie’s perennial story buds, blossoms, grows, and falls from the twisted branches of the Qweepie family tree. The story’s sing-song rhythm creates a songline for readers to follow, scanning a century all told.

The book series begins with a boy starting walkabout, a historical rite of passage into manhood. The moments throughout walkabout are viewed by a magic man chasing along an untimely move from Dawson City, Victoria, Australia’s Outback, to Dawson Springs in rural western Kentucky. This journey becomes a boy’s tracing of his bloodline, discovery of country, and possible death.

DOWN UNDER: Kussins is part of our Summer Reading List for Students! Purchase your own or check the book out at the local library. If it’s not available at the library, request it be added.

DOWN UNDER: Kussins is written by Mark Wayne Adams. This is one of books in his award-winning Family Tree Novel series of chapter books:  STATION: OutlawsOZ: InlawsNO WORRIES: Momus & MamaaysOUTBACK: Bothers & SinistersDOWN UNDER: KussinsG’DAY: AintsMATES: Uncools, and WALKABOUT: Mates.

Kussins on The Authors Show

  • M. W. Adams give us a quick synopsis of your Family Tree Novel series and DOWN UNDER: Kussins.

The Family Tree Novel series is a real and relevant story about modern family relationships and hometown history.

In DOWN UNDER: Kussins, Pester’s unyielding pranks force Driew to question his biggest bother’s not-so-loving intentions. During Driew’s countrified lessons with twins, Able and Cain Poe, a brotherly secret surfaces. Driew vows to protect family secrets and moments, carving their words down under the Outback tree’s protective bark.

  • Is there a specific type of reader you had in mind when you wrote your book?

I wrote this book for tween/teen readers to understand family roles and how love works. Whether readers are the oldest, middle, youngest, adopted, blended, or an only child, they’ll related to a Family Tree Novel character. The series’ Walkabout moments offer family perspectives of Driew’s journey along an uprooted Aboriginal songline.

  • What influences your writing style?

Reading is a strong influence. When writing middle grade YA, I must research myself at that age: fears, actions, and reactions to surviving your social tribe. In my youthful exploration of love and family, I used books like: The Five Love Languages of Teenagers, Gary Chapman and Growing Up First Born, Kevin Leman.

Research is a fascinating influence. In the Family Tree Novel series I decided to include my research as second source reading for educators. Beyond the book reading includes: local history, traditions, foods, and social factors.

Lastly words and language are important influence in writing. Words have unique meanings in various cultures. Take for example Caddywompus, (a non-derogatory word to describe functions or actions associated with uncharacteristic behaviors, socially or physically). My neighbor used the word to describe a table with a short leg, or a photo that hung off-centered on the wall.

  • What makes your characters unique?

Each teen characters express love differently based on the role they play in family hierarchy. I also like that each has their own sense of humor that sparkles throughout.

  • Where can we purchase your book?

If visiting the small town from the book, Dawson Springs, Kentucky, Southern Belles and Notions on the town square or Pennyrile Forest State Resort Park gift shop are my two favorites. The books are available at my publisher’s website: syppublishing.com, my website: markwayneadams.com, or any major retailer.

The full interview and original broadcast are available at The Authors Show.

 

“A well-crafted work that reads like poetry.” —Ruffina Oserio, Readers’ Favorite

down-under-kussins-3d-book-cover-9781596160385-www-mwa-company-72dpiReviewed By Ruffina Oserio for Readers’ Favorite

DOWN UNDER: Kussins by M.W. Adams is a family tree novel for young readers, a well-crafted work that reads like poetry, featuring very good and believable characters and a plot that will undoubtedly have readers turning the pages. The main character, Driew, is not an ordinary kid, and of course his parents think it is useless leaving him with a cellphone. From the very first page, readers are pulled into the world of the protagonist, a world that rhymes with a lot of tension and activities and danger. Very early in the story, the reader understands that Driew already has a huge problem dealing with his one sibling: “I don’t want to live another tortuous year as Pester’s little brother. Can’t Pester resolve his issues to become a loving brother?” The reader is pulled into the dynamics of family life and conflicts, but the adventure of Driew is what will take their breath away. Follow him down the hazardous path under.

The writing is like nothing I have read before, an original voice and a turn of phrase that has its unique signature. M.W. Adams has a bubbling imagination that comes out powerfully in the morphology of his writing, the cast of characters, and the compelling plot. The plot is fast-paced with a lot of drama and powerful scenes to pull the reader in. I read the entire story within twenty-four hours and enjoyed the plot lines, the characters, and the themes that center on the family. Down Under: Kussins is fun and entertaining.