“What advice would you give yourself fresh out of college?”—Anna Faktorovich, PhD Interview

Faktorovich: If the young you, fresh out of a BFA program, strolled into your office today and asked you for advice on managing his coming illustration, animation, and writing career, what advice would you give him? What has been the biggest problem on your path you wish you could have avoided? Has there been an opportunity you now wish you had taken?

How to Win Friends & Influence PeopleAdams: I’d give him the best advice I’ve ever received from a stranger. I met her on a flight returning from Los Angeles. She recommended I read these three books: The Greatest Salesman in the World, because we all want to give up. Love is Letting Go of Fear, we all have a personal obstacles to overcome. How to Win Friends and Influence People, because you’re not a people person until you learn to listen.

When the student returns after reading these, I’d recommend, The Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines. And I’d recommend he select two fields of illustration. The first being his focus; the second an alternate income stream. Next I’d recommend seeking out the ugly books in the world and being a better illustrator than the publisher’s existing illustrator.

My greatest problems were not understanding my value and not having a mentor/support system. My first illustration clients took advantage of my inexperience by underpaying and not sharing profits through royalties. I also invested thousands of dollars displaying my portfolio along with hundreds of other illustrators. I also joined organizations that charged to critique my portfolio.

IMG_2307Through trial and error, I learned good clients want to share their success; hanging with publishers is more profitable than hanging with illustrators; and non-paid critiques from professionals are genuine. The opportunities I would have taken sooner, are joining a publishing organization like IBPA (Independent Book Publishers Association); cultivating a professional mentor relationship with an illustrator—not as a crutch; and starting my business fresh after graduation.

If I started again from college graduation, I would purchase a building with two storefronts in a small town for the price of a house. One unit’s rent would cover the mortgage. The second unit would serve as my business/studio. The upstairs would be converted to my loft/home. My clients would be found at large conferences where publishers and authors congregate. Technology makes small businesses into global business.

Who says being 20-something is a requirement to start a business. I might retire at 50 and start something new!

Read the complete interview with Mark Adams, Award-Winning IllustratorAdams-Author Bio Photo-mwa.company-template with Anna Faktorovich, PhD

How to Build an Author Platform in Schools

The short answer:  One event at a time! Establishing yourself as a speaker doesn’t happen through self proclamation. Here are three general rules I followed entering the children’s book market.

Be informative, entertaining, and professional.

These qualities set speakers apart from wannabes and mundane know-it-alls.

  • Informative enough that attendees leave empowered hearing your message.
  • Entertaining in a way that attendees share their experience others.
  • And professional in the execution of a quality message.

Speak with audiences.

Speak “with” audiences and you’ll communicate “with” everyone. Speaking “at” or “to” audiences creates a disconnect. Having connections leads to referrals and repeat attendance. Audiences who enjoyed your presentations bring new friends each time they hear you speak.

Connect with other professional speakers. 

Attend others events to watch the speaker and audience interactions. Take notes. How do they connect? Can their technique be applied to your public speaking? Most speakers are great mentors. Especially, when the mentee pays attention, asks valid questions, and applies techniques.

Reading Resources:

Schools a Niche Market for Authors by Jane R. Wood.

Mark Wayne Adams, Author & Illustrator of King for a Day, the Story of Stories