Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

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This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe reading experiences.

MOMENT ONE: lacrosse

MOMENT TWO: blue, larrikin, tallo, tobacco, water well

MOMENT THREE: bluey, fossick, furphy, mate, stuffed, I’ll be

MOMENT FOUR: Pennyrile

MOMENT FIVE: barbecue, cicada, fella, mob, moolah, Victoria

MOMENT SIX: down under, platypus, puddle-snorts, ta

MOMENT SEVEN: caddywompus, cricket, Darwin, fella, galah, poa, vegemite

MOMENT EIGHT: coydog, digger, galah, malle, Willy Willy, Wolle paper

MOMENT NINE: billa bong, bourbon, mozzie

MOMENT TEN: doovalacky

MOMENT ELEVEN: dingo, marsupial, pig-footed bandicoot

MOMENT THIRTEEN: candlestix, stalactite

MOMENT FOURTEEN: cassowary, joey, Tasmanian tiger

MOMENT SIXTEEN: opal, noodling, stalagmite

MOMENT NINETEEN: noodling

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of Family Tree Novel series, choose these helpful links:

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Kussins on The Authors Show

  • M. W. Adams give us a quick synopsis of your Family Tree Novel series and DOWN UNDER: Kussins.

The Family Tree Novel series is a real and relevant story about modern family relationships and hometown history.

In DOWN UNDER: Kussins, Pester’s unyielding pranks force Driew to question his biggest bother’s not-so-loving intentions. During Driew’s countrified lessons with twins, Able and Cain Poe, a brotherly secret surfaces. Driew vows to protect family secrets and moments, carving their words down under the Outback tree’s protective bark.

  • Is there a specific type of reader you had in mind when you wrote your book?

I wrote this book for tween/teen readers to understand family roles and how love works. Whether readers are the oldest, middle, youngest, adopted, blended, or an only child, they’ll related to a Family Tree Novel character. The series’ Walkabout moments offer family perspectives of Driew’s journey along an uprooted Aboriginal songline.

  • What influences your writing style?

Reading is a strong influence. When writing middle grade YA, I must research myself at that age: fears, actions, and reactions to surviving your social tribe. In my youthful exploration of love and family, I used books like: The Five Love Languages of Teenagers, Gary Chapman and Growing Up First Born, Kevin Leman.

Research is a fascinating influence. In the Family Tree Novel series I decided to include my research as second source reading for educators. Beyond the book reading includes: local history, traditions, foods, and social factors.

Lastly words and language are important influence in writing. Words have unique meanings in various cultures. Take for example Caddywompus, (a non-derogatory word to describe functions or actions associated with uncharacteristic behaviors, socially or physically). My neighbor used the word to describe a table with a short leg, or a photo that hung off-centered on the wall.

  • What makes your characters unique?

Each teen characters express love differently based on the role they play in family hierarchy. I also like that each has their own sense of humor that sparkles throughout.

  • Where can we purchase your book?

If visiting the small town from the book, Dawson Springs, Kentucky, Southern Belles and Notions on the town square or Pennyrile Forest State Resort Park gift shop are my two favorites. The books are available at my publisher’s website: syppublishing.com, my website: markwayneadams.com, or any major retailer.

The full interview and original broadcast are available at The Authors Show.

 

When do you decide to share the OUTBACK writing with others?

When do you decide to share the OUTBACK writing with others?

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I waited until the OUTBACK book was half completed—about eight chapters. These chapters are rough and very general in creative language. My goal was to give a bland idea of the plot, character action, and historical content. If this was enough to inspire others to ask questions or want more, then the creative embellishments would be much easier.

For the first novel, I had my wife read it. She is very thorough and not a reader. Needless to say, she only read it once, and wasn’t excited. My next version was much more polished and the reader had decent feedback.

By the Beta Reader stage, all sixteen chapters had been edited using Fire Up Your Fiction: An Editor’s Guide to Writing Compelling Stories, written by a colleague, Jodi Renner. Her book was a great resource for a newbie or established writer. I went chapter by chapter and was critical of what I’d written. Trimming excess really makes a difference when creating a fast reading fiction book.

Read the full OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters, Conversation with the Author

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

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This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe Outback experiences.

MOMENT ONE:  bothers, G’day, Heterochromia, mate, shonky, sinisters, willy willy

MOMENT TWO:  bloody, boomerang, Kentucky, Outback, shag on a rock

MOMENT FOUR:  furphy, galah, larrikins

MOMENT SIX:  Aussie, Australia, mamaay, momu, sand shoes

MOMENT SEVEN:  sing-song

MOMENT EIGHT:  aints, kussins, Malle, uncools

MOMENT TWELVE:  Billa bing bong boom, bushie

MOMENT FOURTEEN:  water boarder

MOMENT SIXTEEN:  Florida, sunshine state

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of the OUTBACK book, choose these helpful links:

OUTBACK: Word Search

Reading Group Guide for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

“Easy resource for youngsters to learn language.” —Gary Roen, Reviewer

Parts of Speech Parade, New York City
Irina Dolinskiy, author
Mark Wayne Adams, illustrator

“The author and artist have found a fun way to teach different parts of speech to kids. Several of them are nouns, verbs, and prepositions. The combined talents give the rules and show examples of them for children to remember how each parts of speech work together. “Parts of Speech Parade: New York City” is an easy resource for youngsters to learn language.”

—Gary Roen, Reviewer

Read more at The Midwest Book Review…