G’DAY: Family Roots

This complimentary excerpt from G’DAY: Aints. Read the The Magic Man and Moment One also.

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FAMILY ROOTS

“Until you learn to speak their language, you can’t understand family!”

—M. W. Adams

Driew Qweepie’s siblings spoke individual languages, forcing him to struggle when communicating with his siblings, affectionately called bothers and sinisters. Languages like German, Spanish, or Greek he could have studied and learned. But his bothers and sinisters’ unique love languages proved a more challenging endeavor. Upon arrival at the family farm, Driew began discovering each individual’s language through mind-blowing family trials.

Since infancy, Driew’s serving heart grew to appreciate family values and traditions. Maturing meant comprehending new dynamics like hierarchy among bothers and sinisters. Evicting each of his siblings from his mind seemed a bloody good solution to the problems they instigated. But erasing unforgettable family moments from his heart proved to be the ultimate obstacle.

Hoping to release heartbreaking moments from his life, he wrote them upon the branches of the Outback tree, lovingly named Rebecca, by him and his Australian mate, Gulia. Driew hoped the words of his story would remain hidden under the tree’s protective bark. But spoken and written words are difficult to hide once they have been released. With Gulia’s persistence, the stories of Driew’s past slowly unraveled, changing his family relationships.

Now, “love” and “family” are two of his prize words with various definitions to each person he meets. Exploring their meanings leads Driew through a myriad of chaotic journeys and life events continuously crossing a singular songline—his story.

Crossing him most often are his similar but challenging twin siblings, Gayle and Payne. Twins are supposedly lucky and skip a generation, but Driew’s fortune failed to bless him. Sometimes one twin dies during child birth—no luck there. Other times, at birth they are identical—still no luck. Unfortunately for Driew, the Qweepie twins were fraternal and complete opposite in personality. Like most twins, they were bonded and formidable adversaries to Driew like no other siblings in the family.

We have all known a cold, annoying, peculiar, or unyielding sibling. Heck this could be you. But when the sibling becomes a sinister like Gayle, they manifest into a sinister for all time. She became the self-reliant sibling, gently reminding those around her that every person has a story, and Gayle buried her identity below a protective, great white exterior.

Driew’s journey into manhood involves uncovering the best within the family he had been given—every member: bothers, sinisters, kussins, aints, and uncools. He has secretly vowed to leave the Outback family farm better than when he arrived. Unaware of the outcome of his actions, he eagerly aims to heal his family relationships with only his sing-song voice and his loyal mates: Cain, Able, and Gulia.

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G'DAY-Aints-www.mwa.company-Flat Book
Text and illustrations copyright © 2018 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

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“DOWN UNDER: Kussins” Word Search

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DOWN UNDER: Kussins Word Search

Put readers’ skills to the test with our DOWN UNDER reader word search. Can your reader find all the words related to the book, Australian Slang, and the Qweepie Family?

See how many words readers can find and have fun with this free puzzle game. This teaching resource is a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers time.

WORD SEARCH KEY

Reading Group Guide for “DOWN UNDER: Kussins”

Reading Group Guide for DOWN UNDER: Kussins

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1. Down Under is defined as the continent of Australia. How does the author parallel down under, when referring to the moments, to Down Under, in reference to the continent of Australia?

2. How is the author’s use of moments rather than chapters important in this series?

3. What are Driew’s early perceptions of his big bother, Pester, and could Pester have been perceived differently if Driew had understood him sooner?

4. How does Pester’s rank in the family hierarchy after Killiope’s departure the military affect his family?

5. In what way has Pester forced Driew to grow? Is there a defining moment in Driew’s maturation?

6. How does Able and Cain Poe’s family life contrast Driew’s? Would they have the same feelings toward Driew as Pester and Payne if they were his brothers?

7. How do you think Pester would have handled being the youngest Qweepie sibling? What are some ways older boys might be treated that the youngest boy wouldn’t be?

8. What discovery in the Dingo chapter stops Pester’s aggression? Is there a line he has crossed that keeps him from forgiving himself?

9. How does friendship resolve the issues Able and Cain have with Driew? How might their relationship be different if it had happened sooner?

10. How does Driew’s relationship with Pester affect his relationship with Able and Cain?

11. What role does Dingo play in the novel, as a permanent fixture on the farm and in Driew’s family?

12. What role does water play in Driew’s story? How does it influence Driew’s actions?

13. How do you think Marq’s secret influenced his decisions until he shared it with Nieve and Driew? What affect do you think keeping Marq’s secret will have on both characters’ relationships?down-under-kussins-3d-book-cover-9781596160385-www-mwa-company-72dpi

 

OUTBACK: Word Search

OUTBACK: Word Search

Put readers’ skills to the test with our OUTBACK reader word search. Can your reader find all the words related to the Outback book, Australian Slang, and the Qweepie Family?

See how many of the Outback words readers can find and have fun with this free puzzle game. This teaching resource is a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers time.