DOWN UNDER: Moment One

This complimentary excerpt from DOWN UNDER: Kussins.

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MOMENT ONE

BOUNCES

Ding!

The “Ding” sound beckoned Driew’s chasers.

Driew’s big sister, Killiope, had left for bootcamp a week ago, after her high school graduation. He anticipated a summer break between his sixth and seventh grades, free of sibling torture—not the case. Her handed-down cell phone blasted cryptic messages to him.

Ding!

”U LOST SOMETHING! MEET U OUTBACK W/ IT”

Driew responded to the text message reluctantly.

”KEEP IT!”

Driew thrust the phone over the bluff into the Tradewater River below. You bounces can reach me in person, he thought. Driew refused to accept the bully’s texts. Enduring torments from his remaining bothers and sinisters was enough.

His parents had felt giving Driew a cell phone was pointless, knowing he wouldn’t have service or any intentions to use it while on his Outback adventures. He settled their concerns with that one toss.

Bounces possess unlimited bullying power using uncaring devices. Hurling stoney words online and in person hurts.

Driew felt their painful attack—instantaneously. A white object struck his back. The pain stung between his shoulder blades like his big bother Pester’s lacrosse ball. He ran from the three hooded figures, no longer the four he had been running from his entire life.

Cryptic text messages led him to discover his discarded items in the early summer Outback. Meeting the bounces seemed like an ace idea.

Cawing crows alerted the chasers to Driew’s location. Disguised calls chased behind him, as he tore through new saw briars and blossoming honeysuckle vines.

”There is no family crueler than ours!” called a winded chaser.

The Qweepies’ tired barn silhouetted against the half moon on the ridge. Home at last! The promise of safety, Driew thought, catapulting over the board fence, separating field from forest.

Inside the barn’s shelter, Driew hid inside the last remaining vehicle from the farm cleanup. As he hunkered in the front seat, silhouettes marched along the barn door opening. Why torture me?

He felt for the cell phone’s light, realizing the phone now lit the way toward the Mississippi River. Within a week, he had developed a reliance on its addictive apps and features.

Thirst tightened around his throat, strangling for moisture. He longed for his canteen filled with his Australian friend Gulia’s well water. Having no water or knife left him stranded, armed with only his boomerang. Casting was more dangerous in the dark; the boomerang might hurt him upon its return. The one thing I control, I don’t understand, Driew thought.

From the doorway, three figures surveyed the lifeless barn for Driew’s whereabouts. The tallest culprit stepped into the barn, disappearing in its evening shadows.

An eerie hiss tore through the barn’s dark rafters. The sound grated across Driew’s skin causing his body to paralyze with fear.

”Bobcat! Let’s get outta here!”

Mumbles of fear and laughter raced from the barn, followed by their three shrinking shadows.

Bobcats comforted Driew more than bothers and sinister’s attacks. He guardedly made his way through the barn’s shadows into the field toward the farmhouse’s back porch light.

His parents’ profiles sipped drinks under the porch light. They were acclimated to open-air living and southern cuisine. Driew was acclimated to nightly runs toward their safety.

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Text and illustrations copyright © 2016 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

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DOWN UNDER: Introduction

This complimentary excerpt from DOWN UNDER: Kussins. Read Moment One and Moment Two also.

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INTRODUCTION

“You can’t change songlines—but you can change pecking order.”

M. W. Adams

Everyone holds a story within them. The telling is done in various ways. No one remembers every loving and fearful line, only the moments.

Timing plays the most important factor in childhood. Songlines and birth order direct the outcome of a child’s dreamtime. A songline is one of many paths across land and sky, marking an Aboriginal creator-being’s route during dreaming.

A child cannot change dreaming or songlines, but can change chain of command—thus affecting his or her family tree. The footprints a child follows along a songline may uproot family trees in sacred lands.

Footprints are landmarks used to navigate songlines. A child singing the proper sequence of steps fearlessly walks about the Never Never. Crossing through diverse family lands, language is not a barrier when singing the proper way. Singing the wrong way is a curse.

Children must continually sing-song, keeping lands and family trees “alive.” Their sing-song stories are a rise and fall of words—dreaming. To understand children is to follow the rhythm of the creator-being’s songline they follow.

Driew Qweepie’s songline leads him Down Under, unearthing buried moments he recovers and treasures.

In my story of ordinary people, extraordinary things exist, Driew thought.

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Text and illustrations copyright © 2016 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

OUTBACK: Introduction

This complimentary excerpt from OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters. Read Moment One and Moment Two also.

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INTRODUCTION

“Before you can understand your family tree, you must uncover its magical roots.”

M. W. Adams

A family tree supports various magical branches throughout extreme conditions. Its survival requires continual sacrifice. Therefore, when a diseased branch causes imminent danger, it is shed. Its loss is felt deep into the roots.

In Aboriginal culture, family stories are told in sing-song, a repeated, rhythmic voice rising and falling over the Australian continent. When a family member is lost, speaking his name is forbidden. His spirit continues through sing-song until his family falls silent.

Modern society records life through silent words, written with the belief that one hundred forty characters will exist perpetually. When a family member dies, his name is liked and shared until an algorithm deletes his wall. Modern society lives in the now and rarely explores its family’s deleted past.

Both cultures send children to play in their Outback. In this magical land, thought to be a childhood safe haven for creating memories, children are lost, stolen, or barely escape. Their extreme Outback adventures are buried, never to be unearthed through words or song.

For generations, the family tree records words and sing-song that wind deep in its core. Children playing in or around the tree may accidentally sever or uproot disturbing moments hidden in their Outback.

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Text and illustrations copyright © 2016 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.