AR Reading Quiz for “G’DAY: Aints”

AR Reading Quiz for G’DAY: Aints

17-Adams-FTN-G'DAY-Reading Quiz
1. Who are Driew’s tormentors in Moment One?

2. Which character is Driew’s “uncool” in this book?

3. Where did Driew learn Ida Mae’s fruit tree had grown?

4. What does Marq use as a trade for Jameson Junior’s mule, Kate?

5. What gift does Gulia receive from Momu?

6. What business does Chi and Mac start in Dawson Springs?

7. What event caused Nieve and Marq to leave their Florida home?

8. Which found object does Driew’s Magic Man use for the doll’s eyes?

9. What missing object did Killiope return to Driew at Nieve’s wake?

10. How does Gayle receive the money for her braces?



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Reading Group Guide for “G’DAY: Aints”

Reading Group Guide for G’DAY: Aints


1. G’Day is defined as “hello.” How does the author parallel the book, G’Day: Aints, to the greeting “hello?”

2. Does “G’Day” appear to be a friendlier greeting than “hello” for the children?

3. Have you or someone you known ever suffered through the loss of a loved one? What action(s) did you observe at each stage of grief?

4. How does the loss of one person in your community affect relationships, finances, and businesses?

5. Are field trips and writing about local landmarks important to school age children to better understand their community and their roles for its future?

6. What are Driew’s perceptions of his little sinister, Gayle, and could she have been perceived differently if Driew had understood her sooner?

7. In what way(s) did Gayle’s friendship with Snow force Driew to grow? Is there a defining moment in Driew’s maturation?

8. How does Driew’s adopting the word “oldies” to replace the word “parents” influence your view of Driew’s parents? At what age did you see your parents as old and why?

9. How do you think Gayle would have handled being the youngest Qweepie sibling? What are some ways the youngest boy might be treated that the youngest girl wouldn’t be?

10. What action stops Gayle’s aggression toward Driew in moment nineteen? Do you have love line boundaries drawn in your own family relationship?

11. How does Gayle’s stealing influence Driew’s relationship with her, Snow, and Nadia? How might their relationship be different if she had been open sooner?

12. What role does Marq’s dependence on substance affect Driew’s family?

13. What role does “Aint” Nadia Eli play in Driew’s story? How does she influence Driew’s perspective of character traits?

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AR Reading Quiz for “DOWN UNDER: Kussins”

AR Reading Quiz for DOWN UNDER: Kussins

16-Adams-FTN-DOWN UNDER-Reading Quiz

1. What state did Driew move from?

2. Which character is a “digger” in this book?

3. What artifacts do the Poe boys discover Outback?

4. Which marsupial does Driew adopt as a pet?

5. What country does Gulia visit on holiday?

6. What food attracts visitors to the Dawson Springs Annual Homecoming?

7. What name did Gulia and Driew give to their tree?

8. What found object does Driew use to light his way?

9. What summer responsibility does Marq give Driew instead of mowing?

10. Which of these characters is not Driew’s kussin?





AR Reading Quiz for “OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters”

AR Reading Quiz for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

16-Adams-FTN-OUTBACK-Reading Quiz

1. Who is the Australian girl-next-door?

2. Who is the housekeeper in the book’s name?

3. What does Killiope do to earn the money needed to pay Gulia to walk Driew home?

4. What object does Killiope use to torment Driew?

5. Who is Driew Qweepie?

6. What project does Driew help his father, Marq, complete?

7. What town did Driew move to?

8. What name does Driew give to the mysterious floating eyes?

9. Where is the entrance to Driew’s workshop?

10. What was the first gift he received from Gulia?



OUTBACK-Bothers &


OUTBACK: Moment One

This complimentary excerpt from OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters. Read the Introduction and Moment Two also.




“Be them ever so cruel, there’s no family crueler than ours!” Driew Qweepie’s hooded tormenter chuckled. “Go! Here comes that Brown kid!”

Four teenage silhouettes bounced through the overgrown pumpkin patch, their escape concealed by the shadowy tree line.

Fall’s first cool breeze crept through the once popular town of Dawson Springs, ending the suffocation of summer’s dog days. Driew Qweepie’s tween body hung limp in his overalls from the scarecrow’s post. Cawing crows, darker than his hair, mocked him from their perch above.

His eyelids rose and fell over eyes of blue and green. Heterochromia, the condition was called, thought to be hereditary, or caused by a disease or an injury. Since he was healthy and the only family member with heterochromia, Driew’s explanation was an unimaginable injury. His siblings teased, “Dropped on your head is your problem.”

Thick wire-rim glasses obscured the condition. Non-family members awed at Driew’s pleasing appearance. His dark complexion, chocolate ringlets of hair, and dwarf-like size made him a doll for sure.

As he hung from the scarecrow’s perch, his consciousness swayed like a porch swing in a gentle wind. The hangin’ left him to reflect on his family hierarchy. An unwritten historical timeline that flipped through his mind recalled a decade of prank-filled albums created by four tormenting siblings. Soon his eleventh year would bring new volumes of teenage tortures.

Labeled “little bother,” he was the youngest and lowest ranking member in the Qweepie family. From the first moment of his life, he learned trust was not easily earned. His bothers’ and sinisters’ torments had worsened since moving to the Kentucky farm.

His parents, Nieve and Marq Qweepie, uprooted their Florida lives to resolve nasty letters received about their farm’s demise. Marq listed the property for sale after his father died and never intended to return. Ida Mae, the caretaker during Marq’s absence, became feeble and unable to maintain the farm properly.

“She needs you. She needs you,” a voiced echoed melodically, awakening Driew. His heavy eyelids rose to reveal a hazy heterochromic gaze reflecting his own.

“PSST! Holy Dooley! You alive mate? G’Day! Here down under!” a voice called below him.

Driew’s light-sensitive eyes focused on the pumpkin patch. Behind the scarecrow’s post, the setting sun cast a veil of darkness over the stranger. “Wh-wh-who are you? Wh-wh-what do you want?” Driew’s voice screeched into the silent patch.

“I heard whimpers. Thought I’d find an abandoned pup out here, or something entertaining. People dump treasures off this road all the time.” The stranger pointed toward the road leading to the Qweepie farm.

Scarecrow was an elevation from being a “little bother.” This prank signified his torturous life—a pawn to ward away intruders.

“No worries. They aren’t coming back,” coughed Driew.

“Who did this, mate?”

“My bothers and sinisters.”

The stranger tugged at Driew’s overall straps, releasing him from their confines. The stranger backed away in awe of Driew’s glide to safety.

A whirling cloud of dust howled through the patch. Crows abandoned their perch, alerting the hillside of the disturbance.

“A willy willy! Let’s rack off! These spirits give me the heeby jeebies!” The tween stranger grabbed Driew’s overall straps and led him away.


Text and illustrations copyright © 2016 by Mark Wayne Adams. All rights reserved. Family Tree Novel is a SYP Kids imprint.

Who is Ida Mae?

Moment Five: Celebrate

“They be the heathens! Never had me no children, and they be the reason!” Ida Mae tossed a bottled water through a torn grocery sack, and it landed on her boot.

Driew twisted the glass doorknob, opening the back door carefully to avoid hitting Ida Mae. She glanced up at him, forcing a smile. “Ah, Driew, son! Wicked bags these days.”

“Your teapot was boiling, Miss Mae. Do you need my help?” asked Driew, returning her smile to disguise what he had seen.

“I must have turned the stove on in my rush for the store. Lucky you were here. I could have burned the house down!” Ida Mae tossed a water through the opened kitchen door. The bottle stopped against the pantry door. Her aim proved she had unloaded in this manner before. “I likes a sweet brew before leaving for the day.” Ida Mae continued into the kitchen past Driew, her smock filled with bottled waters.

OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters by M. W. Adams

When you began the Family Tree Novels, did you have the adventure completely outlined?

When you began the Family Tree Novels, did you have the adventure completely outlined? How have you been surprised along the way? Were the introductions of additional characters  important in the influence of the story’s direction?


At the start of the series, I had a thin thread of intention of the entire series, five books. I’m a supporter of timelines and outlines. I used several drafts that were stimulated from the main outline. The titles and Australian theme came as I introduced Gulia’s character. The attraction to Australia and the region inspired the titles.

The character that surprised me the most was Ida Mae. She was a character who was a first draft villain. “The maid did it” theme was my original intent with Ida Mae. Through the revisions, I saw the potential of her adoption into the family. She forced me to choose a dark underlying problem in my childhood to face. I think she has become a fabulous addition to the story.

Read the full OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters, Conversation with the Author

Reading Group Guide for “OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters”

Reading Group Guide for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

1. How does the author parallel out back the yard to Outback the Australia region?

2. What are Driew’s perceptions of his big sinister, Killiope? Could Killiope have been perceived differently if he understood her sooner?

3. Can you relate to siblings as Bothers and Sinisters? Have there been times when your actions were bothersome or sinister toward your siblings? Were those feelings resolved?

4. In what way has Killiope forced Driew to grow? Is there a defining moment in Driew’s maturation?

5. How does Gulia’s family life contrast Driew’s? Would Gulia have the same experience as Driew if they were switched at birth?

6. How do you think Killiope would have handled being the youngest Qweepie sibling? What are some ways the youngest girl might be treated that the youngest boy wouldn’t be?

7. What stops Killiope’s anger in the Blue chapter? Is there a line she has drawn that keeps her from going too far? Do you have lines drawn in your own family relationship?

8. How does the tornado resolve the issues Killiope has with Driew? How might their relationship be different if the blue had happened sooner?

9. How does Driew’s relationship with Killiope affect his relationship with Ida Mae and Gulia?

10. What role does Ida Mae play in the novel as a permanent fixture on the farm and in Marq’s family?

11. What role does Jameson Junior play in Driew’s story? How does he influence Driew’s actions?OUTBACK 3D-book-72DPI-RGB

12. For most of the novel Eli, the diary, has influenced Gulia and Driew’s friendship. What are other influences that affect both characters’ relationship?

13. Does the Outback appear to be a safe haven for children?