Language of the Outback

Family Tree Novel Series Language of the Outback

Adopting new words and terms helps better describe your Outback and how you lived it. Family Tree Novel readers are introduced to a variety of Australian, American, and Qweepie vernacular throughout the novel series. Choose to adopt or to adapt these terms in your Outback language.

Aborigine: the Australian people whose ancestors were indigenous to the continent before colonization

Aint: aunt

Aussie: Australian

Aussie Aussie Aussie, Oi Oi Oi: is a cheer or chant often performed at Australian sport events

Australia: flat, dry, country that is also a continent the size of the United States

Barbecue: both a cooking method and an apparatus, meat is cooked slowly over low, indirect heat and flavored by the smoking process. Also the title of the Dawson Springs’s annual homecoming event established in 1949.

Baccastix: name given by Driew to a tobacco stick used to hang tobacco plants from scaffolds and tobacco barns. Driew’s baccastix burns with a low level light, similar to a torch.

Barbie: barbecue grill for grilling food

Billa bing bong boom: falling head over heals

Billa bong: ponds created when a creek or river waterway changes path, leaving the branch as a dead end

Bloody: very

Boomerang: a curved, flat piece of wood traditionally used by Australian Aborigines as a hunting weapon (Gulia also uses this as a term to mean “right back at you” or “come again” and to avoid saying something mean-spirited)

Blue: fight (“He was having a blue with his sister.”)

Bluey: pack, equipment, toe, also redhead

Boozer: heavy drinker of alcohol

Bother: male sibling referred to as brother

Bounce: a bully

Bourbon: a barrel-aged, distilled spirit made primarily from corn

Bushie: someone who lives in the bush

By jingo: an expression of assent or assurance

Caddywompus: non-derogatory word to describe functions or actions associated with uncharacteristic behaviors, socially or physically

Calaboose: jail

Candlestix: name given by Driew to a flaming wooden “stick” that burns with a low level light, similar to a torch

Cassowary: large flightless bird native to Australia, shy until provoked, what capabilities to inflict fatal injuries to dogs and people

Chrissie: Christmas

Cicada: an insect with wide-set eyes and membrane-like wings. Its loud, cryptic song is produced by dreamlike vibrations. It is divided into two species that live in Australia and around the world.

Colour: Australian English uses ‘our’ and American English ‘or’ spelling for the word color

Coydog: a wild, candid hybrid resulting from a coyote and a dog mating

Cricket: a bat and ball game with eleven players; the world’s second most popular sport

Crikey: in awe, amazed, astonished

Darwin: a capital city in Australia

Digger: a soldier

Dingo: free-range, wild dog introduced into Australia’s habitat

Doovalacky: used whenever a person cannot remember what something is called

Down Under: term comes from the fact that Australia is located in the Southern Hemisphere

Estray: legal term, any domestic animal wandering ownerless

Extinction: the end of a species

Fella: also spelled fellow, feller, fullah, fulla, and balla, and is combined with adjectives or numerals, or is used to indicate plural pronouns. Examples: big fella business = ”important business;” one-feller girl = ”one girl;” sing out, big fella = ”call out loudly;” me fella = ”we” or ”us.”

Feral: became wild after escaping captivity or civilization

Florida: 27th state of the United States, a southeastern U.S. peninsula between the Gulf of Mexican and the Atlantic Ocean, nickname the “Sunshine State” for its numerous days of sunlight

Fossick: prospector or to search, rummage. Example: “Are you fossicking through the garbage?”

Furphy: false or unreliable rumor

Galah: fool, silly person

G’Day: hello

Georgia: 4th state of the United States, has the largest land mass of any U.S. state east of the Mississippi River, nickname the “Peach State” for its peach trees

Govies: governesses

Half past: time is told as half past the hour

Heterochromia: dual eye color condition thought to be hereditary, a disease, or caused by an injury

Holiday: vacation

Joey: infant marsupial

Kentucky: 15th state of the United States, centrally located and nicknamed the “Bluegrass State” for the bluegrass found in many of its pastures due to the fertile soil

Knock back: refusal (noun), refuse (verb)

Kussin: cousin

Lacrosse: contact sport that uses a long-handled stick called a crosse

Lamingtons: a square sponge cake with chocolate icing and coconut dusted over the top

Larrikin: prankster

Malle: a eucalyptus species whose biomass is converted into ethanol or electricity (Hayder’s use the word to describe a type of moonshine created from the eucalyptus species’ biomass)

Mamaay: Australian grandfather

Marsupial: a class of mammals, most of which carry their young in a pouch

Mate: friend

Mickey Mouse: excellent, very good; in some parts of Australia the phrase means inconsequential, frivolous, or not good

Milk bar: corner shop that sells takeaway food

Milko: milkman

Mob: family, group of people, or herd of kangaroos

Momu: Australian grandmother

Mongrel: despicable person

Moolah: money

Mozzie: mosquito

Muddy: mud crab

Mum: mother

Never Never: the center of Australia, Outback

Northern Territory: third largest Australia federal division; the least populous of Australia’s eight major states and territories

Oldies: parents

Opal: rare, natural gemstone of Australia; formed in sandstone with some iron oxide content, usually as fossilized tree roots

Outback: interior of Australia, the back country, or back yard

Pennyrile: the geographic area of Kentucky named for the pennyroyal plant

Pennyroyal plant: a species of flowering plant with fragrant spearmint leaves, the essential oils of which are used in aromatherapy; the plant is also high in pulegone, a highly toxic volatile organic compound affecting liver and uterine function.

Platypus: a semiaquatic Australian mammal that lays eggs instead of giving birth, and the sole living representative of its family classification

Pig-footed bandicoot: a small marsupial of Australia that is presumed to be extinct

Poa: a genus of about 500 grass species, native to temperate regions of both hemispheres, and commonly named “bluegrass”

Quid: make a: earn a living

Ripper: great, fantastic

Sand Shoes: tennis shoes

Shag on a Rock: obvious

Shonky: underhanded

Sing-song: a repeated rising and falling rhythm of a person’s voice

Sinister: female sibling referred to as sister

Songline: one of many paths across land and sky, marking an Aboriginal creator-being’s route during dreaming

Spiffy: excellent, great

Stalactite: a type of mineral formation that hangs from the ceiling of caves, hot springs, or man-made structures such as bridges and mines

Stalagmite: a type of rock formation composed of minerals that rises from the cave floor due to the accumulation of material deposits

Sunshine State: official nickname of the U.S. state of Florida and the Australian state of Queensland

Swag: rolled up bedding etc. carried by a swagman

Spook: ghost-like apparition

Stuffed, I’ll be: expression of surprise

Ta: thank you

Tallo: water from a mineral spring, containing salts and sulfur compounds; may be “sparkling” due to gases

Tall poppy syndrome: when someone becomes popular others try to cut them down

Tasmania: an island state of the Commonwealth of Australia located south of the Australian mainland, and is the 26th-largest island in the world

Tasmanian tiger: thylacine or thylacinus cynocephalus (Greek for “dog-headed pouched one”), largest native Australian carnivorous marsupial of modern times, believed to be extinct. Named because of its striped lower back; also called Tasmanian wolf.

Testimony: proof or evidence of something by its appearance or existence

Tobacco: a product prepared from the cured leaves of the tobacco plant, which is used around the world

Tucker-bag: food bag

Uncool: uncle

Vegemite: dark brown Australian food paste prepared with various vegetable and spice additives combined with leftover brewer’s yeast extract

Victoria: territory of Southern Australia

Water Boarder: tourists who visited Dawson Springs wells between the 1890s and 1920s—the “Water Boarder” era

Water well: a structure dug into the ground to access groundwater in underground aquifers. Water is drawn by hand using buckets or mechanically by a pump. Well shaft linings of wood, stone, or metal create wall stability.

Willy Willy: whirlwinds that represent spirit forms in Aboriginal myths. Spirits may emerge from the spinning vortex of dirt and punish children who misbehave.

Wolle paper: handmade paper created from rotting Wollemi pine

Yer: your or you’re

Yowah nut: found in the far South Western mines at Yowah in Queensland, ironstone stones resembling ‘nuts’ which contain precious opal within their center

Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

Language of DOWN UNDER by Moment

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This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe reading experiences.

MOMENT ONE: lacrosse

MOMENT TWO: blue, larrikin, tallo, tobacco, water well

MOMENT THREE: bluey, fossick, furphy, mate, stuffed, I’ll be

MOMENT FOUR: Pennyrile

MOMENT FIVE: barbecue, cicada, fella, mob, moolah, Victoria

MOMENT SIX: down under, platypus, puddle-snorts, ta

MOMENT SEVEN: caddywompus, cricket, Darwin, fella, galah, poa, vegemite

MOMENT EIGHT: coydog, digger, galah, malle, Willy Willy, Wolle paper

MOMENT NINE: billa bong, bourbon, mozzie

MOMENT TEN: doovalacky

MOMENT ELEVEN: dingo, marsupial, pig-footed bandicoot

MOMENT THIRTEEN: candlestix, stalactite

MOMENT FOURTEEN: cassowary, joey, Tasmanian tiger

MOMENT SIXTEEN: opal, noodling, stalagmite

MOMENT NINETEEN: noodling

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of Family Tree Novel series, choose these helpful links:

14 Florida/Georgia Conferences and Book Festivals

Florida/Georgia Conferences & Book Festivals

 

Amelia Island Book Festival

Hosted by: Amelia Island Book Festival

Website: Amelia Island Book Festival

Description:

The Festival is a community endeavor. More than 200 volunteers come together to bring this gift to people of all ages. Attendees come from far and wide not only to enjoy the festival, but also to explore this  beautiful island, located just north of Jacksonville, Florida, and a bridge span away from the mainland. Along with first-class restaurants, resorts and inns, visitors will find 13 miles of unspoiled, golden beaches, scenic marshes and rivers, historic sites, nature trails, fishing, golf and kayaking, art and of course—books galore!

 

National Book Club Conference

Hosted by: National Book Club Conference Foundation

Website: National Book Club Conference

Description:

Over the course of 15 years, some of the most famous and talented authors have been a part of what the NBCC calls “literary bliss”. Important to the NBCC, however, is to introduce new or lesser-known authors that have created stories that are entertaining, informative and important.

 

AJC Decatur Book Festival

Hosted by: AJC Decatur Book Festival

Website: AJC Decatur Book Festival

Description:

The AJC Decatur Book Festival is the largest independent book festival in the country and one of the five largest overall. Since its launch, more than 1,000 world-class authors and hundreds of thousands of festival-goers have crowded the historic downtown Decatur square.

 

Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading

Hosted by: Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading

Website: Tampa Bay Times Festival of Reading

Description:

Book. Music. Authors. Food.

 

Miami Book Fair International

Hosted by: Miami Dade College

Website: Miami Book Fair International

Description:

The first Miami Book Fair International, founded by Miami Dade College and community partners, took place in 1984. Since then, it has been recognized as the nation’s finest literary festival. In 2001, the Fair became part of The Center for Writing and Literature @ Miami Dade College, a cultural and academic initiative that promotes the advancement and appreciation of literature throughout the year.

 

FAPA Annual Conference

Hosted by: Florida Authors & Publishers Association

Website: FAPA Annual Conference

Description:

This networking and educational event will offer two days of sessions with a focus on The Business of Publishing.  Industry leaders share their expertise and a variety of tools needed to flourish in this evolving publishing environment.  Join your industry colleagues and discover innovative marketing ideas and sales strategies.

 

F.R.E.S.H. Book Festival

Hosted by: Donna M. Gray-Banks

Website: F.R.E.S.H. Book Festival

Description:

Fiction, Romance, Erotica, Spirituality, Health and more!

 

Tampa Bay Black Heritage Festival

Hosted by: Tampa Bay Black Heritage Festival, Inc.

Website: Tampa Bay Black Heritage Festival

Description:

The Tampa Bay Black Heritage Festival is an annual, cultural arts & music festival that takes place over the course of 10 days in Tampa Bay, Florida. They host an Author Village. Check out AALBC.com’s coverage of the Author Village in 2017

 

Southwest Florida Reading Festival

Hosted by: Southwest Florida Reading Festival

Website: Southwest Florida Reading Festival

Description:

There really is something for all ages to experience at the Southwest Florida Reading Festival. Everyone enjoys the multiple stages with the celebrity authors who share ‘inside scoop’ about their latest books or what makes a story idea click for them. You will be able to buy books and have the authors personalize and sign them too! You’ll find our numerous book and educational vendors offering the latest in services and new ideas. Kids will be mesmerized by the storytellers.

 

Dahlonega Literary Festival

Hosted by: Lumpkin County Literacy Coalition

Website: Dahlonega Literary Festival

Description:

The Dahlonega Literary Festival is an annual celebration of books that takes place in March. Situated in Historic Downtown Dahlonega, the festival continues to grow and become more delightful as the years go on. Ours is an intimate festival about books and authors with a mission to promote interaction between readers and writers in a relaxed, informal environment. Visitors have an opportunity to meet and interact with the authors. In addition to attending speaking events and book signings, attendees can have lunch with their favorite authors at a local restaurant.

 

The Punta Gorda Literary Fair

Hosted by: Copperfish Books and Florida Gulf Coast University

Website: The Punta Gorda Literary Fair

Description:

Literary events take place Monday through Friday, culminating in the big one—Saturday’s street fair featuring artists, musicians, food, and lots of authors and books from 10 a. to 3 p.m. Authors will line the Herald Court Breezeway and adjacent streets. From a children’s garden of fun and games to musicians and art, lively workshops, and readings, the book fair offers fun and information for all ages.

 

Venice Book Fair and Writers Festival

Hosted by: Pam Johnson

Website: Venice Book Fair and Writers Festival

Description:

The Venice Book Fair and Writers Festival is a small, unique program hosting writers teaching writers on Friday night, and authors selling and signing their books to the public on Saturday. All proceeds from the Venice Book Fair and Writers Festival go to Venice Heritage Inc., the 501(c) 3 fundraising arm of two historic sites in Venice, the Lord-Higel House, currently under restoration, and the Venice Museum and Archives expansion project.

 

AWP Conference

Hosted by: AWP Conference

Website: AWP Conference

Description:

The AWP Conference & Bookfair is an essential annual destination for writers, teachers, students, editors, and publishers. Each year more than 12,000 attendees join our community for four days of insightful dialogue, networking, and unrivaled access to the organizations and opinion-makers that matter most in contemporary literature. The 2016 conference featured over 2,000 presenters and 550 readings, panels, and craft lectures. The book fair hosted over 800 presses, journals, and literary organizations from around the world. AWP is now the largest literary conference in North America.

 

Oxford Exchange Book Fair

Hosted by: OE Book Fair

Website: OE Book Fair

Description:

“It is our mission at Oxford Exchange to continually foster human engagement, spark meaningful dialogue and establish Tampa’s place as a cultural destination. We launched the OE Book Fair in 2015 to provide an open platform for local authors to connect with their community face to face. A broad array of genres and interests are represented, complimented by discussions and workshops throughout the day of the fair. We hope you’ll join us the discovery of local literary talent!”

2016 FAPA Award-winners!

Congratulations to Linda Smigaj, Eddie Price, and M.W. Adams! Their books: Little Miss Grubby Toes, Steps on a Bee!, Mayflower: Fly on the Wall Series, and OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters, were selected as medalists in the 2016 Florida Authors and Publishers Association (FAPA) President’s Awards. Gold, silver, and bronze medalists will be announced at the 2016 FAPA President’s Awards Banquet on Saturday, August 6, 2016, at the Hilton Orlando/Lake Buena Vista Hotel at the Walt Disney World Resort.

The awards banquet follows FAPA’s Annual Conference: Capture Your Publishing Dream. Over a dozen publishing professionals including Eddie Price will speak on topics from intellectual property to niche marketing. The annual conference not only open to FAPA members, but also authors and publishers nationally. Hotel reservations can be made at FAPA’s group rate of $126.00 at Hilton Orlando/Lake Buena Vista Hotel at the Walt Disney World Resort.

Once again, congratulations to Linda Smigaj, Eddie Price, and M.W. Adams!

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As a Kentucky native and a Florida transplant, how autobiographical is this story in comparison to your own?

As a Kentucky native and a Florida transplant, how autobiographical is this story in comparison to your own?

16-OUTBACK-Conversation_With_The_Author

I did pull from my own experiences of visiting my Kentucky family as an adult and how my Floridian children must feel when visiting Dawson Springs for weeks at a time. Growing up in Kentucky, my family was average middle class to most people living there and poor to outsiders when compared to big city living.

My childhood is a far cry from my adult life in a manicured Florida suburb. I wanted to share how caring for even the worst home can change everyone’s perspective. Like Gulia grew to love the Qweepie farm saying she “could live there forever.”

Read the full OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters, Conversation with the Author

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

Language of the OUTBACK by Moment

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This list is for teachers and parents. Discuss these words with readers before they read each chapter. Readers may have difficulty with words that don’t appear in everyday discussion. Adopting new words and terms builds a better vocabulary to describe Outback experiences.

MOMENT ONE:  bothers, G’day, Heterochromia, mate, shonky, sinisters, willy willy

MOMENT TWO:  bloody, boomerang, Kentucky, Outback, shag on a rock

MOMENT FOUR:  furphy, galah, larrikins

MOMENT SIX:  Aussie, Australia, mamaay, momu, sand shoes

MOMENT SEVEN:  sing-song

MOMENT EIGHT:  aints, kussins, Malle, uncools

MOMENT TWELVE:  Billa bing bong boom, bushie

MOMENT FOURTEEN:  water boarder

MOMENT SIXTEEN:  Florida, sunshine state

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For more resources using the Language of the Outback or discussion of the OUTBACK book, choose these helpful links:

OUTBACK: Word Search

Reading Group Guide for OUTBACK: Bothers & Sinisters

My Family: “Last Roll Call” Excerpt

Chapter 3:  My Family

I was very happy and proud to see my family doing all we could to help with the war efforts. We did the best we could with our ration cards and were always willing to help out other families who never seemed to have enough food and supplies. Because Dad produced food for the public, he was entitled to more than the usual ration of gasoline which was two gallons a week. My family never went hungry, but we sure did eat a lot of mullet and beans. Even today, fried mullet and lima beans remain one of my favorite meals, maybe with the addition of a little coleslaw.

The Last Roll Call written by Kenneth Tucker and Wanda Tucker Goodwin.

How to Win Friends & Influence People: MWA, Inc. Must Read List

My childhood dream was to become a Walt Disney animator. In November 1995, during the pursuit of my dream, I booked a flight from Florida to California. I’d never been on an airplane much less to California. Was my dream worth moving across the United States?

Being a country boy at heart—California’s mountains, lakes, and oceans were more appealing than Florida’s flatlands. Runs along massive beaches, visits to major tourist sites, and Yosemite National Park made this a monumental trip. So what event caused me stay in Florida?

A lady with an ora of wealth sat next to me during my return flight to Florida. Okay, maybe it wasn’t her ora as much as her gem-covered hands reflecting wealth. Who was she? Are those costume rings? How did she earn her wealth? I awkwardly asked, “You appear successful. May I ask how it happened?”

She smiled back. I anticipated a fantastic story! Her answer wasn’t fantastic, but an interview of my life. She asked questions about my family, occupation, recreation, and monetary goals. Her questions were genuine, as she listened to each of my answers. Twenty minutes into the conversation, she asked, “Do you still want to know how I became successful?”

“Yes! Of course I do.” I said.

She said, “The secret is three books. Practice everything in each book. Don’t read the next book until you’ve completed last. The first book is How to Win Friends & Influence People.”

“My college friends and I joke about this book.” I chuckled.

“You shouldn’t laugh. We’ve talked for nearly thirty minutes, and you haven’t asked my name. Read this book first!” she said.

In so many ways, she was right. My listening improves each time I read this book. That’s why I’m reading How to Win Friends & Influence People this month. Her second book was even more impactful. I’ll share it next month.

10 Reasons for Joining FAPA: Florida Authors & Publishers Association

Mark’s TOP 10 Reasons for Joining FAPA (Florida Authors & Publishers Association):

1.  Get advice from other professional publishers.

2.  FAPA social media provides current and practical information by publishers for publishers.

3.  FAPA helps define your Florida platform and the markets you serve.

4.  You can display your books at FAPA-staffed booths at the major industry trade shows.

5.  FAPA educational Programs. The Annual Publishing Conference brings you to another level as you learn new skills and make key contacts.

6.  FAPA Membership is on $65!

7.  Being a member makes you a part of the largest community of Florida publishers. FAPA promotes the interests of independent authors and publishers.

8.  Meet a network with real people in the industry our online communities on Facebook, LinedIn and Twitter.

9.  Save time. FAPA has the tools and resources to guide you in the right direction when you need ideas and know-how, including the marketing progress to relieve you of clerical chores so you can do what you do best-plan your work and work your plan.

10.  Invest in your future. FAPA is constantly looking ahead toward the next generation of the profession. Publishing changes at light speed.

FAPA President’s Letter: January

I’m the illustrator of forty children’s books, author of three, and publisher of twelve in six years. Today’s readers require immediate entertainment both socially and through new books. Writers and illustrators are morphing into publishers to meet the demand. I’m one of them.

The publishing education is morphing too. Facebook groups, Twitter, LinkedIn, and publishing blogs are real-time learning. Social media following isn’t enough for a modern publisher. Conferences and social events are necessary too. The best information is shared through interpersonal relationships.

I participate in both regional and national book events like Book Expo America, Decatur Book Festival, Readers’ Favorite Awards, and FAPA Conferences. I also travel four months each year as a public speaker in schools and professional organizations throughout the southeast. I learn a great deal through these professional social experiences. Until I’m asked a question, the knowledge is mine.

The same is true for the FAPA Board Members. They bring the professional experiences that benefit members no matter the social platform. Be sure to connect online and in person.

Mark Wayne Adams,  2015 FAPA President