FREE Activity “Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!”



Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!
: FREE Coloring Page.

The Little Miss Grubby Toes Series includes many activities. Put readers’ skills to the test with our coloring pages to reader word search. These teaching resources are a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers and parents time.

Visit award-winning author Eddie Price to learn more about upcoming events or to schedule a Little Miss Grubby Toes event.

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FREE Coloring Page “Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!”


Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!
: FREE Coloring Page.

The Little Miss Grubby Toes Series includes many activities. Put readers’ skills to the test with our coloring pages to reader word search. These teaching resources are a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers and parents time.

Visit award-winning author Eddie Price to learn more about upcoming events or to schedule a Little Miss Grubby Toes event.

Coloring Page “Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!”


Little Miss Grubby Toes: Plays with Fire!
: FREE Coloring Page.

The Little Miss Grubby Toes Series includes many activities. Put readers’ skills to the test with our coloring pages to reader word search. These teaching resources are a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers and parents time.

Visit award-winning author Eddie Price to learn more about upcoming events or to schedule a Little Miss Grubby Toes event.

Activity Page “Little Miss Grubby Toes: Steps on a Bee!”



Little Miss Grubby Toes: Steps on a Bee!
: FREE Activity Coloring Page.

The Little Miss Grubby Toes Series includes many activities. Put readers’ skills to the test with our coloring pages to reader word search. These teaching resources are a fun and easy activity that will keep students happy and save teachers and parents time.

Visit award-winning author Eddie Price to learn more about upcoming events or to schedule a Little Miss Grubby Toes event.

5 FREE Ways to Promote Literacy Week

When promoting a literacy event, choose an author, illustrator, or book that offers educational resources beyond the book. These activities are usually FREE for educators and parents on the author or publisher website. To promote literacy week, use one suggestion daily from the list below.

Day 1—Writing Contest: Choose writing prompts that discuss informational text used by the author. Have students create interview questions, answer these questions from an author’s perspective, or research the historical timeline of the author’s career.

Day 2—Drawing Contest: Art activities fall within most educators requirements. It’s a fun way to illustrate a book page, create a character, or express words through art.

Day 3—Reading Points:  AR reading points or a schools goals.

Day 4—Book Review:  Writing book reviews introduces students to sharing their perstpective. Have them write a review of their book and have parents post the reviews on Amazon or GoodReads for their children. This activity focuses on reading, writing, and internet skills.

Day 5—Book Trailer:  Use a smart phone, iPad, or digital device to create a book trailer of your classes’ favorite book. Animoto or similar programs.

Contest winners could win bookmarks, books, or lunch with the Author/Illustrator. Students could bring a lunch or the coordinator could host a lunch with the guest speaker. This is an opportunity for one-on-one questions and answers in a casual environment.

Staff Book Picks: November

POSP 3D-book

Written by Irina Gonikberg Dolinskiy and Illustrations by Mark Wayne Adams
Hardbound ISBN:  978-1-59616-017-0
Pages: 32
Retail Price: $14.95

The parts of speech come magically alive as they participate in a colorful New York City Parade! Each presents and defines itself as it marches down the street and through a child’s imagination.

 

Written by Linda Smigaj and Illustrated by Mark Wayne Adams
ISBN:  978-1-59616-034-7

Paperback Retail Price: $9.99

History with a Twist Makes Learning Fun!

Welcome to the world of Linda Smigaj’s books. Educator and juvenile fiction author Linda Smigaj, aka Professor Fuddy-Duddy, captures the imagination of readers, ages 7–10, through stories of historically accurate events told from a unique perspective. Come travel through early American history with these adventurous flies.

 

Written by Crystal White and Illustrations by Mark Wayne Adams
ISBN: 978-159616-028-6
Pages: 32
Paperback Retail Price: $9.99

Franny Finds a Home! is a beautiful children’s book complete with vibrant illustrations and educational resources for both parents and teachers, not to mention an exciting and heartfelt story.

Franny is a former stray who was relieved to be saved from the streets. But her rescuer, Trishalou, simply can’t keep her. Franny encounters nice workers at the rescue shelter, but she misses her friends. Shy, and not the cutest critter in the place, will Franny ever be chosen for a forever home?

At the end of the story the author (a 20-year reading teacher) has included resources for teaching or review of text features. These activities can be used with any text.

Review: Does Grandma Have a Mustache?

does-grandma-have-a-mustache-3d-72dpi-rgbRita Fleming has written an enchanting poetry book about the loving and hysterical moments of family life. Fleming’s unique set of poems brought laughter and memories as I read about amusing childlike perspectives.

Does Grandma Have a Mustache? has short poems, age appropriate text, and entertaining illustrations for young readers. The story engagement encourages family and classroom discussion. Families, students, and teachers should adopt this insightful story into reading time!

Reviewed by:

Mark Wayne Adams is an award-winning illustrator, author, and publisher of more than 40 children’s books. View Books and Awards

Website(s):  www.markwayneadams.comwww.mwa.company

Social Media:

“Do you make money for public appearances?”—Anna Faktorovich, PhD Interview

Faktorovich: You were drawing for visitors to your booth at the ALA. I believe you also do these types of drawings during your art presentations at schools. Do you do these public art projects because of your desire to perform your art before a live audience? Do you ever make money on these appearances? Do you use them for research or to market your illustrations to kids? At ALA, were you giving any of the resulting drawings away? You had tossed a few of them onto the carpet in front of you at ALA, and you toss them on the floor of auditoriums etc. in your school presentations. Do you toss them down for symbolic reasons or to illicit sympathy, or because you want to display them and you don’t have board to clip them onto? Were you drawing what visitors asked for, or whatever came to mind? Do you doodle and free-draw to come up with ideas for your illustrations? If not, what do you do to research ideas or to come up with initial character sketches?

AdamsDrawing Is My Super Power! That would be my t-shirt slogan. I find an audience, whether drawing on a pad, a napkin, or in a Best Sketchbook. I drew for free when I was younger. Some people appreciated the gesture, other discarded my effort. In the 3rd grade, I began to charge for my time and the appreciation level increase. This remains true today.

My first professional illustration contracts came from tossing drawings on the floor at Book Expo America in Los Angeles, California. I did this both for symbolic and sympathetic purposes, depending on the audience.

Publishing (writing, illustration, and marketing) is about inspiring an emotion. I can’t keep every drawing, so I give them to conference audiences who feel sympathy when they step on a “pretty picture.” I also joke, “This drawing is worthless until I sign it!” Publishing audiences find my personality a plus in the working relationship.

IMG_6356I’ve meet over 1 million students through paid elementary school visits. I walk on “pretty pictures” to show students and teachers sheets of paper have less value than the pages within a book. This reinforces the need to journal in hardbound books.

Do I give away drawings for free? Yes, I’ve given away over 45,000 drawings in eight years like the ones you mentioned at ALA. My gift makes others happy and in return makes me happy. I do have two rules. Children are the recipients of most drawings unless it’s for a teacher’s classroom or at a conference. Also, I only draw one picture per person, per day. This rule stemmed from my own children asking me to draw instead of doing it themselves. My children get one picture, just like anyone else’s child.

IMG_3952I have over 100 journals (23,000 pages of drawing and writing). These journals are 20 years of research and inspiration. Illustration clients are asked to provide me a list of 5 of their favorite children’s books, 5 new books they discovered at the library or bookstore, and 5 things they’d do for free. Their favorite children’s books tell me who they were. The new books tell me what they expect based on paper types, finishes, and dimensions. Lastly, incorporating something they love in the illustrations will boost discussion topics with readers.
Read the complete interview with Mark Adams, Award-Winning IllustratorAdams-Author Bio Photo-mwa.company-template with Anna Faktorovich, PhD

Book Review: A Hand Truck Named Dolly

A Hand Truck Named Dolly 3D-bookKay Whitehouse has written an empowering chapter book about a loving blue hand truck named Dolly. Dolly’s adoption comes with a unique set of challenges brought on by Bear, her new family’s standard poodle puppy. Her story is filled with amusing sibling pranks and humorous puppy accidents.

A Hand Truck Named Dolly has short chapters, age appropriate text, and entertaining illustrations for young readers. The story engagement continues with activities like: Fill in the Blanks, a Crossword, Word Scramble, and Word Search. Free printable versions of these activities are available at the author’s website: www.ahandtrucknameddolly.com.

Dolly’s helpful, pleasing personality is a fresh perspective. Families, students, and teachers should adopt this insightful story and its educational activities into reading time!

Hand trucks have been a part of my business and home for decades. Since reading Dolly’s story, my three loyal hand trucks have received names: Tiny, Flip, and Mo.

Reviewed by:

Mark Wayne Adams is an award-winning illustrator, author, and publisher of more than 40 children’s books. View Books and Awards

Website(s):  www.markwayneadams.comwww.mwa.company

Social Media:

Anna brings new meaning to the traditional phrase, “as a fly on the wall.”—Gracie Bradford, Readers’ Favorite

Mayflower-Fly on the Wall Series-3D-book
Reviewed by Gracie Bradford for Readers’ Favorite

Mayflower: Fly on the Wall Series is written by Linda Smigaj. This 50-page fiction book written for 7-10-year-olds by a retired elementary school teacher of 34 years conveys a powerful lesson. The main characters are Professor Beatrice Fuddy-Duddy and Anna, a cheese fly. The story dates back 400 years, starting in the year 1620 to chronicle the arrival of a ship called the Mayflower. Anna is a cute little character dressed in a stunning, colorful outfit; she wears a bow tie and displays colorful wings. The book contains journal entries about what transpires on the ship as seen through the eyes of a fly. Anna brings new meaning to the traditional phrase, “as a fly on the wall.” I think this book would be an excellent addition to classrooms of a younger age group, given the exceptional illustrations throughout the book and a well-developed story line.

Linda introduces a lesson on early American history with a twist to make learning fun. This book has pictures throughout, making it easy to comprehend concepts. Equally important are ten non-fictional facts elementary school kids probably did not know about the journey of the Mayflower. A glossary provides additional insight into the story. The highlight of the book is illustrations of six flies dressed in an array of colors with unique shapes and forms. Kids will love these characters, and the questions associated with the pictures are sure to generate interesting discussions. The illustrations are outstanding. The main character is well developed and lends itself to a book series.