Meet Eddie Price: “Widder’s Landing” and “Little Miss Grubby Toes Series”

Eddie Price is a lifelong native of Kentucky. A graduate of Kentucky Wesleyan College (BA) and Western Kentucky University (MA and Rank I). Eddie has taught history for 36 years (31 at Hancock County High School). He has also taught part-time classes for Owensboro Community & Technical College.

The winner of numerous teaching awards, Eddie has coached many award-winning academic teams and history contest winners. He is active in the Hancock County Historical Society and helped organize the Young Historians Club. Eddie is world traveler who enjoys bicycling, horseback riding and swimming. He now lives in Hancock County, Kentucky.

Eddie is also an award-winning author of Widder’s Landing, Life and Love on the Kentucky Frontier. The first book in his children’s book series is Little Miss Grubby Toes, Steps on a Bee. Eddie’s charismatic personality shines through in Little Miss Grubby Toes naughty but lovable character.

Let Eddie bring his award-winning teaching style to your classroom! Author Eddie Price is renowned for his energetic, educational school visits. He combines his talents with safety personnel in your community to present an entertaining lesson that could save lives.

Visit www.eddiepricekentuckyauthor.com to learn about Eddie’s books and presentations.

Eddie Price
175 Windsong Drive
Hawesville, KY 42348
Author Facebook Page www.facebook.com/eddieprice.1954
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Contacting Clients: Illustrator Follow Up

Be selective with projects and be selective with clients. The pitch has been made though a previous meeting. The potential client’s contact information was received. Now what? Continue the momentum through prompt follow up!

  • Send an email to the contact within two days. The email should include the Who, What, When, Where, Why, and How. Use this example:

“Hello Ms. Jones,

    We meet (where?) at Book Expo America (when?) two days ago. I was (who?) the somewhat funny illustrator. Your (what?) book about fairies sounds exciting. (why?) We can create a profitable story using both our talents. (how?) My contact information is listed below. 

Our meeting was brief.  Did you have any additional questions?

Kindly,

The Professional Illustrator

  • Follow up one week later with an email that reminds the contact of your first email and ends with, “please kindly respond upon receipt.” They will feel obligated to respond or end the discussion.
  • FAQ’s Section Reduce email time by creating daft emails with answers to frequently asked questions.
  • Give correct information. If the information isn’t readily available, don’t make something up. Kindly respond, “Great question! I will research this topic and get back with you shortly.” This builds credibility and doesn’t cause frustration.
  • Be a good listener. Observation is key. Ask personal questions using this simple F-O-R-MF: What is your Family like? O: What is your current Occupation? R: What do you do for Recreation? M: What do you do for Money.? Here are examples:
  1. Mr. Smith do you come from a large family? I bet the Smith children love to read your stories!
  2. I bet you use your talent in your occupation. What does your employer think of your writing?
  3. I run for fun. What would Mr. Smith do for recreation?  I noticed you like sports Mr. Smith, do you play?
  4. I bet working for your company is financially rewarding. If money were not an issue, what are 5 things you’d do for free Mr. Smith?
  • Determine a deadline on the third email. Determine when a client wants to release their book. If the project is six months from starting, kindly email the client once every other month. Keep the enthusiasm you’ve created in the first email. Offer your windows of illustration opportunities. If a project is not of interest, give clients a referral to a trusted illustrator.
  • Be in control of time. Don’t chase a contact! If there has been no communication, file the contact as tentative. There are hundreds of other authors willing to make illustrating easy.

Resources:

Blog Post: Contacting Clients: Illustrator Elevator Spiel

Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines, Graphic Artist Guild

Contacting Clients: Illustrator Elevator Spiel

Keep it simple. If asked, “Do you illustrate books for other people?” or “How much do you charge?” follow up with this simple elevator spiel.

“Yes, I illustrate professionally. Many clients choose cost effective Royalty Contracts for full use of the illustrations from books to licensed products. Do you have a card Mr. Smith? I can explain more in an email.”

Spiels quickly qualify clients. The mention of pricing, professionalism, and a contract deters non-paying clients and attracts serious clients. A concise spiel is a must at book events, conferences, or on elevators.

Resources:

Blog Post: Contacting Clients: Illustrator Follow Up

Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines, Graphic Artist Guild

Meet Carol “Boots” Hensel

Johari’s Joy is Boots Hensel’s second picture book in her zoo series. A member of the Society of Children’s Book Writers and Illustrators, the Florida Writers Association, Tallahassee Writers Association, and Florida Authors & Publishers Association, Ms. Hensel lives in Florida with her husband and two labrador retrievers. Her oldest daughter, son-in-law and grandchildren live close by. When she is not with them, you can find her walking the beach thinking of new stories.

Carol’s Books:

Student Questions: “Who is Russell?”

Who is Russell?

Russell is the reason I lived in an imaginary dog house from 2008 until 2009. During Spring of 2008, I worked full-time from home—all alone. My only companionship was Blu, our 12 year old dalmatian. Her time was consumed with finding lizards.

So, I began my search for the right family dog. My kids were six and eight. The dog needed to be full of energy, tough, and smart enough to survive the Adams Family. My preparation was watching national dog shows and Caesar Milan: The Dog Whisperer. I  read various dog books on breed facts. Finally, I chose the Jack Russell breed—without any input from my family.

I didn’t mention adopting the puppy to my wife, Angela. “No!” had become her unconscious answer to my unending puppy talk. So, I did what I always did when Angela told me no. I did it anyway!

Rusty's Baby PhotoSurfing the internet, I discovered a puppy photo that was too cute! A face I knew our family would love his entire life. I drove seventy miles to Ocala, Florida just to meet this little guy. FYI, most people do not meet a puppy without coming home with him. That happened to me.

On the way home, heavy traffic and lack of planning meant I had to bring the puppy with me to the kids’ school. No time for a memorable family puppy surprise with videos and pictures. Within five minutes his given name, Rusty, creatively became Russell—”for .Jack Russell, Dad.”

That night the kids and I met Angela at the school’s Family Reading Night. The kids were sworn to secrecy about Russell because mommy didn’t know. That lasted about fifteen seconds. The kids told a neighborhood friend. The friend told her parents. Then, the parents asked Angela about her new puppy. Angela’s response, “What puppy?” She knew. I knew. The entire school knew.

On the way home, Angela constructed an imaginary dog house. Not for the puppy, but for me. I mentally packed my belongings. Thankfully, Russell’s charm won her heart too. Lies, deception, and a poorly executed meeting didn’t stop our family from adopting little Russell.

He was Daddy’s Good Boy and Bad Bad Boy from day one. The Bad Bad Boy cried at night, peed on the floor, and chewed a corner of our new ottoman. (The kids and I’ve kept that secret until now.) The Daddy’s Good Boy won hearts with his intelligence, endurance, and loyalty. Life in the Adams household wasn’t life without Russell.

Daddy's Good BoyRussell is still a great companion. He rides four-wheelers in Kentucky, swims in our Florida pool, and rests at my feet while I watercolor. He and I know each other so well. He’s protected me from the occasional backyard snake, entertained me with squirrel surveillance, and has become a true character in life and books. Russell appears in many of my illustrated picture books. He can be found in:  Parts of Speech Parade, King for a Day, Treasure Island, Franny’s Rescue, and a soon to be a Russell Toy Pattern. You may discover him in other locations like school visits, at events, and in a Best Sketchbook.

As an author, illustrator, and publisher, his adoption has given me inspiration from under foot. After eight years, my answer to Who is Russell? He’s family!

Kirkus Review: “Parts of Speech Parade, New York City”

Parts of Speech Parade, New York City
Irina Dolinskiy, author
Mark Wayne Adams, illustrator

Dolinskiy’s debut picture book explains parts of speech in rhyming text accompanied by Adams’ phenomenal illustrations.

Nouns, verbs, adjectives, prepositions, conjunctions, and interjections all appear in this rhyming text. Images accompanying the parade feature a racially diverse assortment of New Yorkers: children, adults, and animals of all shapes and sizes appear in clearly recognizable locations, beginning with the Statue of Liberty and traveling through places that include Rockefeller Center, Grand Central Station, and Central Park.

With wonderful pictures and well-worded descriptions, this picture book will be an excellent supplement to grade-school lessons on grammar.”

Read more of the Kirkus Review…