Meet Jen Goble, Author

The author, Jennifer Goble is an energetic wife and mother of two wonderful children. She owns and operates FUNdamentals, which offers Parent & Me classes in Forest Hill, MD. She is best known for her radiant smile and passion for life. Her book, Pop the Bubbles 1,2,3, allows readers to experience a day in the life of two youngsters as they learn to count while they skip, hop, jump, and bounce. The main characters, Chloe and Bryce cannot wait to get to FUN class. Follow them as they enjoy music and physical activities while they count to 10. Keep your eyes out for hidden pictures in the book that include a dog that loves peanut butter and a bear named 2. The illustrations, by Mark Wayne Adams, bring the story to life through colorful page turning images. This brings the simplicity of counting to a new level of excitement. Counting to 10 has never been so much FUN! “Thank you for bringing my dream to life. Your gift is a blessing to all that see it!” – Jen Goble

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Meet Angela C. Adams, CFO of MWA, Inc.

Angela Adams received her Bachelor of Arts degree in Accounting and Spanish from Flagler College in St. Augustine, Florida. She is a Certified Public Accountant with active licenses in Florida as well as Kentucky, and has nearly 20 years experience in both public and private accounting. In August 2013, she joined her husband Mark’s illustration and publishing Company, Mark Wayne Adams, Inc., full-time as the Treasurer/Chief Financial Officer.

Angela became a member of the FAPA Board of Directors to expand her knowledge of the publishing industry. For the past nine years she has been partially involved in the growth and development of her husband’s illustration and publishing business. Now that they are both dedicating 100% of our time to the business, it is essential that she continues to enhance her knowledge by getting involved in organizations such as FAPA. Given her background and experience in accounting and business, she adds value to every organization.

Angela resides in Longwood, Florida with her husband, Mark; two children, Isabella and Carter; and their dogs, Russell and Libbi. Angela Adams can be reached at mwa_inc@icloud.com.

Illustrators Draw a Crowd!

“The only person who can sell a book better than the author is the illustrator.” —Mark Wayne Adams

Authors aren’t the illustrations a key selling point of picture books? So why is getting the illustrator to make public appearances so difficult? Money may be the main factor. Illustrators not making royalties usually don’t promote. Consider offering royalties when hiring and negotiating contracts with illustrators.

Having not only a talented illustrator, but also an entertaining illustrator can boost sales too! An entertaining illustrator’s presence literally “draws a crowd” at events. Why should the illustrator make appearances? They are like magicians transforming words into pictures worth a thousand words.

Illustrators participate in events if royalties are earned. The percentage may be small, however for every book sold around a $1.00 could be earned.  Helping authors and publishers sell 5,000 copies a year, is a $5,000 royalty check that year.  The longer it takes to sell the books, the longer a substantial royalty check takes to arrive. This fact is true for inactive authors too.

Authors and Illustrators can set the selling pace by becoming sales people. Focusing individual and combined energy in selling is rewarding in several areas.

  • Awards:  The benefits are recognition in local and national media, retail sales, speaking engagements, award money, and new contracts.
  • Book Festivals:  The benefits are quick retail sales and new contracts.
  • Book Signings:  The benefits are distributor sales and new contracts.

Most importantly the time spent selling together and individually will Draw a Crowd of readers faster with teamwork. Double one another’s following through association. Working together may also inspire additional books in the series. Making a win win for everyone involved!

Meet Author Wanda Hughes!

Wanda Hughes was born and raised on a small Kentucky farm. As a volunteer missionary, she has enjoyed wonderful opportunities to travel overseas, including building churches in Russia and Brazil.

Wanda now lives in Dawson Springs, Kentucky with her husband of many years, Benny. They have three grown sons and five grandchildren who love to come visit.

Wanda and illustrator Mark Wayne Adams met in Dawson Springs, Kentucky, which is her home and Mark’s hometown. In 2008 Mark illustrated her book, A Guinea in My Cap?

“Thanks again, for a dream come true.” – Wanda Hughes

Are Editors an Illustrator’s Friend?

Professional editors are much like professional illustrators. Each wants a book to reflect his/her personal style and attention to detail. Working as a team from start to finish, creates a cohesive project. Illustrators must acknowledge editors input as the reader’s perspective.
 
A professional editor has his/her own pricing structure and should commit from first edit to press proofing. Editors assist with: page count, layout recommendations, proofing, and of course text edits. Professional editing services are well worth the investment!
 
As an illustrator, demand the final edit before beginning illustrations. Have authors write a brief description of how they envision each page. Illustrators write a description of how you envision each page. From these written ideas a storyboard is created through words, rather than hours of drawing time. Thus minimizing sketch time and optimizing illustration time.
 
One of my favorite professional editors to date is Jennifer Thomas, Beyond Words Editing. We have worked on numerous award-winning books together. Other professional editors I’ve worked with are: Beth Mansbridge, Candace M. Ruffin—The Writing Cane, Jill Ronsley—Sun Edit Write, and more.

Student Question: “What Did You Look Like as a Kid?”

As a kid, I looked like any other kid. At least one tooth was missing from first grade through sixth grade. My 1970’s wardrobe was cool. I didn’t like to brush my hair, however I enjoyed dressing for special occasions. By the sixth grade, I wore glasses—thanks to many hours playing my Atari.

Do you ever think about being an adult? I did. My mind was full of questions. What life would be like when I was an adult? Would I leave home? Would I fly on an airplane? Would I drive a car? Would I look the same in twenty years?

The photos show a gradual change each year. Daily I learned new things shaping me into the man I am today. My parents would say, be a kid as long as you can. I now understand what that means.

Growing up is a slow process, however aging is much faster. My favorite thing about being an adult is: being an adult means you can be a kid too!

Publishing Cheat Sheet

Managing the publishing process for the first time can be intimidating. A cheat sheet would be great! Below is a quick checklist of items you’ll need along the way. It’s the same list I use to stay on point.

Business Plan

A business plan creates a realistic budget and project direction. A business plan requires little money to create, but also time. Research multiple printers, illustrators, editors, and distributors to determine a competitive team for your business model.

Professional Editing

A professional editor is essential! Each has his/her own pricing structure and should commit from first edit to press proofing. Editors assist with: page count, layout recommendations, proofing, plagiarism issues, and of course editing. Professional editing services are well worth the investment!

Copyrighting

One of the most common questions is how to obtain a copyright. Contact the copyright offices or fill out the form online. The average cost is around $45, well worth the investment. Barcode, ISBN setup, ISBN Metadata, and Library of Congress submissions are separate from the copyright process. ISBN standards require multiple ISBN numbers for printed and digital versions.

Copyrighting can be done in the final stage of publishing to include additions in text and illustrations. The publisher or author can submit based on their agreement. The publisher is also responsible for the ISBN and Barcode costs.

Printing

Printers need several items to quote a project: page count, binding style, paper stock, dimensions, deadlines, packaging requirements, and shipping destination. Printing options range from Print On Demand, “Green”, United States, overseas, award-winning, and eBooks. Production is times vary from on-demand to three months, depending on the printer selected.

E-book conversion into e-readers, such as the Amazon Kindle or the Apple iPad is separate from printing expenses. These are sold online through places like iTunes or the iBookstore. A good business plan should include this income stream when projecting sales or negotiating illustration contracts.

Printers

Illustration

Illustrators require the printer and graphic designer guidelines as well as the final edited story. Artists are liberal with time, however a professional illustrator creates according to timelines and budgets. Require communication throughout the illustration approval process using digital proofing. Digital proofing allows remote viewing for the author, editor, printer, graphic designer, and artist.

Three basic illustration contracts are: Purchase Contract, Copyright Contract, or Royalty Contract. A Royalty Contract usually offers unlimited use of the art. Each contract is based on the number of illustrations, artistic style, scanning, manipulation, and digital clean up.

Graphic Design

A Graphic Designer requires clean artwork along, the printer guidelines, additional book content, and the editor’s final edit. Graphic Designers provide scanning services, logos, professional layouts, and press ready production files. These services can be preformed by some professional illustrators. A fee and talent are required for this service as well. Samples should be provided.

As new resources are added and updated, this cheat sheet will be updated. Bookmark this page for future reference, I have.

Finding Inexpensive Illustrators

You’ve found me!

All joking aside. My illustrator friends and I do offer quality and affordability. Most authors and/or publishers ask: “What’s the ball park price to illustrate a 32 page children’s book?” A typical response is: “One thousand dollars per page.”

The author and/or publisher stumbles backwards, stutters, then mumbles, “I could never afford you!”

This quote is worst case scenario before I review a project. As a professional, I request to read the story, require a basic marketing plan, and the budget. Then I quote an illustration project accurately using the Graphic Artist’s Guild Handbook of Pricing and Ethical Guidelines. Project price depends on the number of illustrations required not page count.

If a book has a spread, one illustration spanning 2 pages, it’s considered one illustration. Therefore a 32 page book may only require 16 illustrations. The book may be 32 pages, however the illustrations don’t equal the page count.

This is why my friends and I may be the inexpensive illustrators you’re seeking. Illustrators I would refer are: Mike Woodcock, Christopher Epling, and Steve Riley. I know other illustrators, however the illustrators I listed work within similar pricing.

Mark Wayne Adams, Award-Winning Illustrator of The Belly Button Fairy

Meet Lauri Rubinstein, Author

Lauri Rubinstein, CVCC is the founder and CEO of Limitless Living Now, LLC, My Friendly Giant, LLC and My Friendly Giant Productions, LLC.

She received her BA from the University of Texas at San Antonio. She is a business/life coach, speaker, trainer, and author. As a leader in the direct sales industry for twenty years, Lauri observed that one of biggest reasons people do not accomplish their goals is lack of belief in themselves. Lauri’s life mission is to inspire children and adults to live to their full potential, own their worth, and step into their greatness. Lauri offers speaking engagements, seminars, and coaching to children, business organizations, and parent groups, as well as to individuals.

Lauri’s Books:

“I can’t thank you enough. This process has been wonderful. Thank you for your mentoring and bringing our work to life!” – Lauri Rubinstein

How to Build an Author Platform in Schools

The short answer:  One event at a time! Establishing yourself as a speaker doesn’t happen through self proclamation. Here are three general rules I followed entering the children’s book market.

Be informative, entertaining, and professional.

These qualities set speakers apart from wannabes and mundane know-it-alls.

  • Informative enough that attendees leave empowered hearing your message.
  • Entertaining in a way that attendees share their experience others.
  • And professional in the execution of a quality message.

Speak with audiences.

Speak “with” audiences and you’ll communicate “with” everyone. Speaking “at” or “to” audiences creates a disconnect. Having connections leads to referrals and repeat attendance. Audiences who enjoyed your presentations bring new friends each time they hear you speak.

Connect with other professional speakers. 

Attend others events to watch the speaker and audience interactions. Take notes. How do they connect? Can their technique be applied to your public speaking? Most speakers are great mentors. Especially, when the mentee pays attention, asks valid questions, and applies techniques.

Reading Resources:

Schools a Niche Market for Authors by Jane R. Wood.

Mark Wayne Adams, Author & Illustrator of King for a Day, the Story of Stories